Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940–1950

September 14, 2019December 29, 2019

Gordon Parks was part of what author Richard Wright called “the new tide” of African Americans who were pushing for respect and racial equality in the 1940s. Organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, in collaboration with The Gordon Parks Foundation, Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940–1950 explores the early years of Parks’s career as an influential photographer who captured the essence of the civil rights movement in addition to breaking barriers for African Americans.

From his fashion photographs to his thoughtful depictions of American life, Parks used the camera as his tool for proclaiming the value of an American community built on freedom and equality. Through some 150 photographs, as well as rare magazines, newspapers, pamphlets, and books, Gordon Parks offers an expansive and intimate look at how this pioneering artist became one of the most influential photographers of his day.

Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940–1950 is organized by the National Gallery of Art, Washington, in collaboration with The Gordon Parks Foundation. Bank of America is proud to be the national sponsor of the exhibition. Generous support is also provided by the Kleinheinz Family Foundation for the Arts and Education and the Ann L. & Carol Green Rhodes Charitable Trust, Bank of America, N.A., Trustee.