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Wrapped Oranges on KERA

KERA's Art & Seek blog has a great post today about an 'overlooked masterpiece', Wrapped Oranges, on view now in the Carter's galleries.

William McCloskey, Wrapped Oranges, oil on canvas, 1889
William J. McCloskey (1859-1941), Wrapped Oranges, oil on canvas, 1889, Acquisition in memory of Katrine Deakins, Trustee, Amon Carter Museum, 1961-1985

Photo of the Week: Hine in Dallas

Check out this post about photographer Lewis Hine and his Dallas child labor images over at the Dallas Observer blog. Apparently a Massachusetts historian, Joe Manning, has been tracking down the descendants of the kids depicted in the photos, which were taken about 100 years ago. The Carter has about 60 of these photographs in its permanent collection, and the historian has even been in touch with the daughter of a girl depicted in one of our Hine photographs!

<img src="http://www.cartermuseum.org/sites/all/files/images/P1978-111-26_s.jpg width="550">
Lewis Hine (1874-1940), [Rosy Phillips and Exie Phillips], October 1913, gelatin silver print, gift of Mr. and Mrs. Allan M. Disman

"Rosy" aka Rosa Mae, was working in a Dallas cotton mill when Lewis Hine took her photograph at age 13. According to the Manning's research, she married, moved to North Carolina, and died in 1941.

You can read more about Manning's quest to learn more about these children here.

Photo of the Week: Volcanic Aftermath

The aftermath of Iceland's Eyjafjallajokull volcano eruption has been making news for days, but we haven't heard much about its long term effects on the environment. We have our own active - and very destructive - volcano here in the U.S., Mount St. Helens.

Our photo this week comes from photographer Frank Gohlke, who documented changes in the Mount St. Helens area for several years after its devastating 1980 eruption. This particular shot was taken a full THREE years after the eruption, and might look familiar if you visited the Carter during our 2007 exhibition, Accommodating Nature: The Photographs of Frank Gohlke.

<img src="http://www.cartermuseum.org/sites/all/files/images/P2007-12_s.jpg width="550" alt="Frank Gohlke, Aerial view: looking southeast over Windy Ridge and visitors parking lot, 4.5 miles northeast of Mount St. Helens, Washington 1983, gelatin silver print">
Frank Gohlke, Aerial view: looking southeast over Windy Ridge and visitors parking lot, 4.5 miles northeast of Mount St. Helens, Washington 1983, gelatin silver print, © Frank Gohlke

Photo of the Week: Lewis Hine & the WPA

This week marks the 75th anniversary of the creation of the Works Progress Administration, which provided millions of jobs as part of the New Deal. During the eight years it existed, the WPA was the largest employer in the country. People working in the arts were hard-hit by the Great Depression, but many of them found work on WPA projects throughout the country.

One of these was photographer Lewis Hine (1874-1940), who was the WPA's chief photographer for a project showing changes in American industry. Even before the Depression, Hine was known for his photographs documenting child labor, American workers, and war relief efforts in Europe. In addition to the photograph below, the Carter has a collection of Hine's work including child labor photographs that were exhibited in our 2006 exhibition Lewis Hine: Children of Texas.

This is one of Hine's photographs done for the WPA's National Research Project.
Lewis Hine, Rayon Warping, Skinner & Sons, Holyoke, MA., 1937, gelatin silver print
Lewis Hine, Rayon Warping, Skinner & Sons, Holyoke, MA., 1937, gelatin silver print

Photo of the Week: The Egg: Staged, Harmonious, Reflected, and Encircled

Eggs were a symbol of spring long before the easter bunny made the scene. There are numerous depictions of the egg in the Carter's photography collection, but none as interesting as these photographs by Denton, Texas (by way of Minnesota, India, Michigan, New York, Europe, Ohio, and Alabama) photographer Carlotta Corpron. An art teacher at what is now Texas Woman's University, Corpron was influenced by Laszlo Moholy-Nagy and Gyorgy Kepes, who both (surprisingly) spent time working at the Denton campus.


Carlotta Corpron (1901-1988), Eggs in Stage Setting, gelatin silver print, ca. 1948
© 1988 Amon Carter Museum, Gift of the Dorothea Leonhardt Fund of the Communities Foundation of Texas, Inc.


Carlotta Corpron (1901-1988), Quiet Harmony, gelatin silver print, 1948
© 1988 Amon Carter Museum, Gift of the Dorothea Leonhardt Fund of the Communities Foundation of Texas, Inc.


Carlotta Corpron (1901-1988), Eggs Reflected and Multiplied, gelatin silver print, 1948
© 1988 Amon Carter Museum, Gift of the Dorothea Leonhardt Fund of the Communities Foundation of Texas, Inc.


Carlotta Corpron (1901-1988), Eggs Encircled, gelatin silver print, 1948
© 1988 Amon Carter Museum, Gift of the Dorothea Leonhardt Fund of the Communities Foundation of Texas, Inc.

Carter Artworks Here and Around the Country

Even if you’re not planning to be in Fort Worth anytime soon, you can still see works from the Carter’s permanent collection on loan to museums all over the country.


Eliot Porter, [Trip down Colorado River with Georgia O'Keeffe and Porter family (Steve and Kathy)], dye imbibition print, 1961, © 1990 Amon Carter Museum

Photo of the Week: Welcoming Spring

I stumbled across this image a while back and have been looking for a reason to post it ever since. Spring's late arrival in North Texas seems like a good enough reason to me! How better to welcome sunshine and warm weather than by throwing on your favorite toga and running around barefoot in the woods?

(This is actually a portrait of German opera singer Johannes Sembach (1881-1944) in costume, probably taken during his tenure at the Metropolitan Opera.)


Karl Struss, [Johannes Sembach in costume standing beside lake], autochrome, ca. 1918

It Works on Paper: Behind the Scenes in the Carter's Photo Lab

With the immediacy of camera phones that send multimedia messages and post photos directly to Flickr and Facebook, it’s easy to take digital images for granted these days. When you see images of artworks on a museum’s website, you don’t necessarily think about all the work that went into getting that image (and the accompanying metadata) out there for you to see.

We’ve just passed the halfway point in our NEA grant-funded works on paper digitization project and have thousands of images to show for all of our hard work, which is remarkable because each artwork must be very carefully moved out of storage, shot by the Carter’s photography assistant, and returned to storage. The images are processed and metadata is embedded in each file”¦and all of this happens after the works have been thoroughly cataloged and measured.

Our photography assistant, Rachel, has been trained to handle artworks and makes the day-to-day decisions about the best ways to shoot works on paper whose medium, dimensions, and other needs vary widely across the collection.

Here, Rachel is shooting a Civil War mezzotint from the Carter’s prints collection. She’s using a special camera and studio setup for larger objects in the collection.

Photography assistant Rachel shoots a large print

And here is the fruit of her labor, an accurate reproduction of the print. Not only will this image end up on the Carter’s website, it will also be used internally by staff from several departments and made available for educational programs and museum publications.

 Pickett's Charge, mezzotint, 1872
John Sartain (1808-1897), after Peter Rothermel (1812 or 1817-1895), The Battle of Gettysburg: Pickett's Charge, mezzotint, 1872, Gift of Edward L. Mattil

Inside American Moderns on Paper

This Week in the Arts has posted a great podcast interview with Elizabeth Kornhauser, curator of the exhibition American Moderns on Paper: Masterworks from the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, which is now open at the Carter. She provides a lot of great background information about the artists in the show, how exhibitions are organized, and why these works are rarely seen by the public.

American Moderns on Paper: Masterworks from the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art will be on view in the Carter's special exhibition galleries February 27-May 30, after which it travels to the Portland Museum of Art in Maine and back home to the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford, Connecticut.

Edited to add: you can also read a great review of this exhibition in the Star-Telegram.

Photo of the Week: Presidential Portrait (in Snow!)

Since George Washington died several years before the first photograph was taken, we obviously have no photographic images of our first president. But here we have the next best thing: a unique portrait in a medium we here in Fort Worth have become rather familiar with lately.

unknown artist, George Washington, 1913, autochrome
Unknown artist, Geo. Washington 12/10/13, autochrome, 1913