Notes from Underground

Stay Up to Date!

Sign up for Enews

Follow

Join us on any of one of these social networking sites.

New Blog Series: Analog to Digital

Last summer, the Amon Carter was awarded a $150,000 grant from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to digitize and catalog approximately 25,000 photographs from our permanent collection. Work began on the project in the fall, and we are happy to say that we’ve already digitized over 1,000 photographs and cataloged even more. Due to preservation practices and the enormity of our photography collection, these works are exhibited only rarely and many have never been seen by the public.

As the photos are digitized, we’ll post some here on the blog to share with you. Check back often for rarely- and never-before-seen works from the photography collection in posts titled 'Analog to Digital.'

Our first installment comes from one of the first objects digitized under the IMLS grant, an album containing nearly 200 tourist images, all by an unknown photographer, from around the turn of the century. These four pictures just seemed to jump out as I worked on their cataloging.

P1975-151-145_s.jpg
Mr. McMasters, Mr. Osborne, Mr. Ballor. Redlands., gelatin silver print, ca. 1900-1910

P1975-151-25_s.jpg
Bridge Accident at Tempe, Arizona, 1902, gelatin silver print, 1902

P1975-151-38_s.jpg
Tempe, Arizona., gelatin silver print, ca. 1900-1910

P1975-151-57_s.jpg
[Pen of ostriches], gelatin silver print, ca. 1900-1910

Happy New Year!

2011 is just around the corner! Remember this week is your last chance to see the Carter's exhibition American Modern: Abbott, Evans, Bourke-White before it travels to the Art Institute of Chicago and Colby College Museum of Art. And if you can't visit us before the New Year, you can also see a full listing of the Carter's 2011 exhibitions here.

Albert Abramovitz, New Year's Eve, wood engraving, ca. 1934
Albert Abramovitz (1879-1963), New Year's Eve, wood engraving, ca. 1934

Carter Exhibitions Make the Top 10

Thanks to the Dallas Morning News for listing the Carter's exhibition Ansel Adams: Eloquent Light among the top 10 in North Texas AND to D Magazine's Front Row blog for listing the Carter's entire 2010 exhibition lineup among their favorites this year!

Photo of the Week: Fill 'Er Up!

According to the New York Times (but not Wikipedia), the first American drive-in gas station opened in Pittsburgh on this day in 1913. In the ensuing 97 years (or 101, or 105, or 122...your mileage may vary), the gas station has become a symbol of the American love of automobiles and a surprising source of inspiration for artists. Here are four photographs from the Carter's collection that document gas stations across the country.

Berenice Abbott, Sobol Gas Station at Night, New York, gelatin silver print, 1929-1939
Berenice Abbott (1898-1991), Sobol Gas Station at Night, New York, gelatin silver print, 1929-1939, Gift of P/K Associates, New York, New York, © Commerce Graphics Ltd., Inc.

Esther Bubley, Cecil Faris, Mayor of Tomball, Operates a Filling Station, Tomball, Texas, gelatin silver print, 1945
Esther Bubley (1921-1998), Cecil Faris, Mayor of Tomball, Operates a Filling Station, Tomball, Texas, gelatin silver print, 1945, Gift of Texas Monthly, Inc., printed from a negative in the Standard Oil of New Jersey Collection, University of Louisville Photographic Archives, © Standard Oil Company

Ed Ruscha, Flying A, Kingman, Arizona, gelatin silver print, 1962
Ed Ruscha (b. 1937), Flying A, Kingman, Arizona, gelatin silver print, 1962, ©1962 Edward Ruscha

Terry Falke, Gallup, NM, dye coupler print, 1995
Terry Falke (b. 1950), Gallup, NM, dye coupler print, 1995, Gift of Dominic Lam, © 1995 Terry Falke

Photo of the Week: Thanksgiving

Because Thanksgiving is a holiday largely spent indoors, gathered in the kitchen or around the dining room table, here are three photographs from the Carter's collection depicting three very different American interiors. Karl Struss's autochrome shows us what a Long Island dining room would have looked like 100 years ago; Nell Dorr's photograph reveals her own surroundings, considered 'retro' even in the 1940s; and Laura Gilpin documents a mid-century Pueblo style kitchen.

Karl Struss, Residential interior, dining room, ca. 1910
Karl Struss (1886-1981), [Residential interior–dining room], ca. 1910, additive color screen plate (autochrome), © 1983 Amon Carter Museum of American Art

Nell Dorr, Interior of kitchen, ca. 1940
Nell Dorr (1893-1988), Interior of Kitchen, ca. 1940, gelatin silver print, Gift of the Estate of Nell Dorr, ©1990 Amon Carter Museum of American Art

Laura Gilpin, Dining area, Owings residence, Pojoaque, New Mexico, 1963
Laura Gilpin (1891-1979), [Dining area, Owings residence, Pojoaque, New Mexico], 1963, dye coupler print, Bequest of the artist, ©1979 Amon Carter Museum of American Art

Happy Thanksgiving, no matter where or how you celebrate it!

Nathan Oliveira (1928-2010)

Sad news this week: California painter Nathan Oliveira died at his home in Palo Alto. The Carter has 18 Oliveira works in its prints collection; the artist was also the subject of the Carter's 2007 exhibition, Nathan Oliveira: Tamarind Lithography Workshop.

Link: NYT obituary

Variation on Veterans Day

For Veterans Day, something you don't see too often. Here are three printing blocks from the Carter's collection, all used to reproduce military-themed works by Frederic S. Remington in 19th-century publications.

Frederic Remington printing block, Field Drill of Prussian Infantry, 1893
After Frederic S. Remington (1861-1909), Field Drill of Prussian Infantry, reproduced in an 1893 issue of Harper's New Monthly magazine

Frederic Remington printing block, In the Trenches, 1895
After Frederic S. Remington (1861-1909), In the Trenches, reproduced in Remington's 1895 book, Pony Tracks

Frederic Remington printing block, The First Sergeant, Battery K, First Artillery, in Field Trim, 1894
After Frederic S. Remington (1861-1909), The First Sergeant, Battery K, First Artillery, in Field Trim, reproduced in an 1894 issue of Harper's Weekly magazine

A Self-Portrait in the Plaza

Check out this photograph by preparator Les Hofheinz, made while cleaning and re-waxing the three large Henry Moore sculptures on the Carter's plaza. This work is done each year during a period of mild, dry weather (something we don't see much of here in Fort Worth), and helps protect the sculptures from our ice storms and searing heat.

Les took this photo from the scaffolding around the Moore...and then boosted the saturation a bit. Who knew cleaning could be so much fun?

Les_pic.JPG

Photo of the Week: Ansel Adams

This week's photo is from the Carter's exhibition, Ansel Adams: Eloquent Light, which closes this week. Sunday is your last chance to see this (and many other) Ansel Adams photographs in person!

Ansel Adams, Leaf, Glacier Bay National Monument, Alaska
Ansel Adams (1902–1984), Leaf, Glacier Bay National Monument, Alaska, gelatin silver print , ca. 1948, ©2010 The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust

A Pumpkin Camera?

We here at the Carter love all kinds of photographic geekery, and NPR's instructions for making a camera from a pumpkin are no exception (and a nice alternative to your basic Thanksgiving hand turkey)!