Timeline

1886
December

Remington begins illustrations for a series of articles titled “After Geronimo” for Outing magazine; becomes close friends with the editor, Poultney Bigelow.

1886

Two Arizona cowboys, photo taken by Remington, Arizona Territory.

1886

Studio portrait of Francis Parkman, inscribed to Remington; photo by Hardy, 493 Washington St., Boston

Ca. 1886

“Mohave Jim,” photo by Daniel A. Markey, Arizona Territory

1886

An Arizona cowboy, photo taken by Remington, Arizona Territory.

Ca. 1886

Indians in Arizona Territory.

1886

Three Arizona cowboys, photo taken by Remington, Arizona Territory.

Ca. 1886

“The officers of the 10th U.S. Cav. At Fort Grant Arizona Ty.,” including Remington’s friend, Lieutenant Powhatan Clarke.

Ca. 1886

Freight teams crossing the Gila River at San Carlos, Arizona Territory.

1886

An Arizona cowboy, photo taken by Remington, Arizona Territory.

1886

An Arizona cowboy, photo taken by Remington, Arizona Territory.

1886

An Arizona cowboy, photo taken by Remington, Arizona Territory.

1887

Over the next two years, almost 250 drawings by Remington are published—a remarkable record for an American illustrator.

January

The Remingtons move into a larger apartment in Brooklyn, the third floor of a brownstone; one of the rooms is turned into a studio.

For 1887, Remington’s earnings are more than doubled over the previous year

February

Remington exhibits his work for the first time at the American Water-Color Society in its 20th Annual Exhibition; his watercolor sells for $85, a large sum for a work at the time.

March

Remington exhibits his work (also a watercolor) for the first time at the 62nd Annual Exhibition of the National Academy of Design; priced at $250, it fails to sell.

April

Remington travels on the Northern Pacific Railway through North Dakota and Montana to Custer, Wyoming, where he gets a stage to the Crow Indian Agency. From there he goes by rail to Calgary, Canada, thence to the Blackfoot Indian Reservation, south of the Bow River, before returning east via the Canadian Pacific Railway.

May

Remington’s first article, “Coursing Rabbits on the Plains,” appears in Outing magazine.

Summer

Remington stays in Canton with his mother’s family; every day he paints oil studies of the Sackrider horses in various poses, using the barn as a studio.

September

The Remingtons return to New York and move into an apartment in the posh Marlborough House in Manhattan near Columbus Circle, for a rent of $50 a month; Remington begins riding horses in Central Park almost daily.

November 3

Remington writes Lieutenant Powhatan Clarke: “Say old top when you write me write sort of descriptive like—all that you see and do down there while it is stale matter to you is of great interest to the undersigned—tell me what you do and what U.S. soldiers do these days—write any observations you make or hear relative to Indians or Mexicans—who knows but what you might inspire me to make an illustration.

Ca. 1887

Two Indian women on the prairie with a pack horse and travois.

Ca. 1887

”Medicine Man and Winnepeg Jack,” Blackfeet at Gleichen, Alberta.

Ca. 1887

Remington doing a study of a mule at the Sackrider farm in Canton, New York.

Ca. 1887

Hair in Knot (Pisquapita), a Cree Indian, standing in front of his tipi near Calgary.

Ca. 1887

Crowfoot (Sopomoxo), the Blackfoot chief; photo by Ross, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Ca. 1887

Fort Keogh, Montana.

1888

Picturesque California, edited by the naturalist John Muir with four plates by Remington is published; the four plates are also offered separately as individual prints.

Remington’s earnings for 1888 totaled about $8000, more than fifteen times the average annual pay of a wage earner.

February

Remington exhibits a watercolor at the 21st Annual Exhibition of the American Water-Color Society; it is chosen to be illustrated in the catalogue.

February

Remington creates eighty-three illustrations that begin to appear in a series of articles by Theodore Roosevelt in The Century Magazine, later published in book form as Ranch Life and the Hunting Trail.

April

Remington wins the Hallgarten Prize for young artists and the Clark Prize at the 63rd Annual Exhibition of the National Academy of Design for his 1887 painting, Return of the Blackfoot War Party (Anschutz Collection).

June-July

Remington travels to New Mexico and Arizona for The Century Magazine; visits Lieutenant Powhatan Clarke at Fort Grant and accompanies him on a two-week scout on horseback with the Buffalo Soldiers among the Apaches near San Carlos in eastern Arizona. Remington befriends Lieutenant Carter Johnson of the 10th Cavalry and hears of his exploits with the Cheyenne. Returning east, he stays three days at Fort Reno, Oklahoma, observing the Cheyenne. He keeps a journal during his trip, writing notes on color and making observations about the people he meets.

June 22

Remington writes to Eva about his experiences: “We just returned this afternoon from a two weeks’ scout up as far as the Perial Mountains. The particulars are so numerous as to furnish me material for many pictures.”

July 1

Remington writes Eva that he “spent a day in Fort Worth… had a devil of a time.

August

Remington spends the month in Canton, writing articles and painting; on his return to New York the following month, he exults, “I am rushed to death, got two MS—25 Century illustrations—4 chromos—a Harper page & oil painting to make before the end of next month and that wont give me much time [to] monkey.”

December 1

Remington’s “A Peccary Hunt in Northern Mexico” is published in Harper’s Weekly.

Ca. 1888

Studio portrait of Eva Remington; photo by F. Girard, Gloversville, New York

Ca. 1888

A Blackfoot man holding a tack-studded rifle, standing with his horse in front of a tipi; photo by Notman, New York City

Ca. 1888

Unidentified Apache man; photo by Henry Buehman, Tuscon, Arizona Territory

Ca. 1888

Studio portrait of Remington.

Ca. 1888

Chatto, the Apache chief; photo by Henry Buehman, Tuscon, Arizona Territory

Ca. 1888

Remington on horseback, with his notation at the bottom: “Whose de Mug?”

Ca. 1888

A Blackfoot man holding a tack-studded rifle and standing with his horse in front of a tipi; photo by Notman, New York City

Ca. 1888

Remington’s photo of a western stagecoach and horses.

Ca. 1888

Unidentified Indian man on horseback; photo by William Notman and Sons, Montreal,Ca.ada

Ca. 1888

Geronimo, the Apache leader; photo by N. Choate,Ca.lisle, Pennsylvania

Ca. 1888

Mannay, the Apache Chief; photo by Henry Buehman, Tuscon, Arizona Territory

Ca. 1888

Remington’s photo of a pack horse outfit on the prairie.