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Photo of the Week: The Atomic Age, Part II

Today marks the anniversary of the first atomic weapons test in 1945. This first test took place in New Mexico; extensive atomic testing was also done in Nevada and Washington state, which is the subject of this week's photos by Nevada photographer Peter Goin.


Peter Goin, Site of Above-Ground Tests, Yucca Lake, dye coupler print, 1986, © 1990 Peter Goin

Yucca Lake is a nuclear test site in the Nevada desert -- only 65 miles from Las Vegas -- where a shocking 739 tests were performed between 1951 and 1992. This particular photograph shows the aftermath of above-ground nuclear testing, but apparently underground testing at the site also created craters large enough for the Apollo 14 astronauts to use for training.


Peter Goin, Burial Ground [Hanford Plant], dye coupler print, 1987, © 1990 Peter Goin

Hanford was a huge nuclear reactor in Washington state that produced the plutonium used in the first atomic test in New Mexico, tests at Yucca Lake, and the bomb used at Nagasaki in World War II. The plant stopped producing plutonium in the 1940s, but with 53 million gallons of nuclear waste still at the site, it is considered to be the most contaminated nuclear site in the United States. But why is this photograph called "Burial Ground"? The last reactor at Hanford was shut down in 1987, and since then most of the structures have been "cocooned" and buried here in the desert.

Carter Works at Home and Abroad

The Carter currently has several works out on loan to other museums, including three in exhibitions that opened very recently.

First, our 18th-century etching of a Cherokee man, Outacite, is on view at the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa in the exhibition Emissaries of Peace: The 1762 Cherokee and British Delegations through January 2010.

We also have two photographs on view at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (or if you prefer, Musée des Beaux-Arts de Montreal) in the exhibition Expanding Horizons: Painting and Photography of American and Canadian Landscape, 1860-1918 through September 27, 2009.


Karl Struss, The Avenue--Dusk, platinum print, 1914-1915


Frank Jay Haynes, Cascades of Columbia, albumen silver print, 1885

Photo of the Week: Yelling "Fire"

The office buzz this morning was all about yesterday's fire that forced the evacuation of the Getty Center in Los Angeles.

It hits home - obviously Texas has its share of grass fires, as do other ridiculously hot, arid, windy parts of the country. Fire has shaped the history of the West and, not surprisingly, it is a major theme across the Carter's collection, from some of the first artworks to enter the collection, to the present. In the past two years alone, the Carter has acquired 3 photographs depicting fires. Our Photo of the Week is the most recent of these acquisitions:


Debbie Fleming Caffery, Burning Cane, 1999, gelatin silver print
Purchase with anonymous donation to the Stieglitz Circle of the Amon Carter Museum
© Debbie Fleming Caffery
P2007.7

Carter's Curtis on Art & Seek

KERA's Art & Seek blog has a nice little post today about the Carter's recent purchase of a complete set of Edward Curtis's The North American Indian publication. Consisting of 20 bound volumes and 20 portfolios, with a total of over 2000 images, it is a very important acquisition for the Carter. And since I am the person in charge of cataloging it, you will be definitely be seeing more of it here on the blog...so check back!

Another Option to Retail Therapy

Psychologist Miriam Tatzel surveyed 329 shoppers and discovered that folks who put more importance on the shopping experience are happier than folks who concentrate on the “value” of the goods purchased. Also, being with other people increased the enjoyment of the experience. So spend some time instead of money with your friends and family at the Carter and experience great art.

Struss, Karl
[Two women in front of a vine-covered country store] - ca. 1910
Additive color screen plate
Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas
P1983.24.44

Kelley Exhibition on Art & Seek

Nice story on KERA this week about the Carter's exhibition, The Harmon and Harriet Kelley Collection of African-American Art: Works on Paper, which is on view here until August 23.


Ron Adams (b. 1934), Blackburn, 2002, Courtesy Landau Traveling Exhibitions

Photo of the Week: Express Yourself

Every July 4th, Americans stop and consider the personal freedoms enjoy in this country - including the freedom of self-expression. This can take many forms, like writing, art, music...or as this Photo of the Week demonstrates, fashion.


Artist unknown, [Boy in dress clothes], tintype, ca. 1870s, Gift of Sally Wilder

Gotta love that outfit. Happy July 4th!

Photo of the Week: Cooling Off

Our current hot weather is the inspiration for Photo of the Week. What better antidote to a blistering hot Texas summer than a shot of a lovely ice cave? This photograph comes from one of Eliot Porter's trips to Antarctica aboard the National Science Foundation's research vessel, the Hero, in the mid-1970s when Porter was in his mid-70s.


Eliot Porter, Ice Cave, Scott Base, Ross Island, Antarctica, December 7, 1975, dye transfer print

Photo of the Week: Blue Prints and Blueprints

This week marks my seventh anniversary at the Carter, so our Photo of the Week comes from an exhibition that was installed when I first arrived here in the summer of 2002, Out of the Blue: Cyanotypes from the Permanent Collection.

Cyanotype is a process that basically produces a monochromatic image like any other black-and-white photograph, but the chemicals used in the process produce a blue-and-white photograph. The process was invented in the 1840s and was used for certain applications, such as blueprints, for the next century because the process was cheap and easy – only requiring sunlight, water, and two chemicals. You can make your own cyanotypes quite easily by purchasing pre-treated photosensitive paper or fabric from art supply stores, or making your own. I've used the pre-treated fabric to make photograms in the backyard and can attest that it's pretty fun.

Without further ado, one of the 102 cyanotypes in the Carter's permanent collection:


Frederick A. Greenleaf, [Men in wagon fording stream running between low hills], cyanotype, 1877-1885

Work Beyond the Reading Room

If you are one of the patrons of the Amon Carter Museum Library, all that you might see is the reading room, and one of the fine library staff members helping you find what you need in the library. The reading room is a great space - quiet and welcoming – designed by architect Philip Johnson. At the east end are the periodicals which the Carter subscribes to, along the south wall are the major reference works in the library (catalogue raisonné, etc.) and the Bio Files. On the west wall are the study alcoves, and the north wall displays the collection of exhibition catalogs held at the Carter. It’s a wonderful space, and as I said, really the only space that most patrons of the library see. Behind the scenes, though, it’s a different world.

For example, how does the Carter decide what resources to add to the library’s large collection of over 100,000 items? What path do these items take from the bookseller to the stacks? What happens when a patron requests a book? What about interlibrary loans? Also, the library is just not books, periodicals, and ephemera. It is also a repository for some very important archives – such as the archives of Laura Gilpin, Eliot Porter, Karl Struss, and important records relating to the history of the museum itself. What of the archives, then?

My mind was filled with these questions when I began volunteering at the library here at the Carter. My name is Jason Dean, and I am a student at Syracuse University earning my Master’s degree in Library and Information Science. Before I started my library science program, I contacted the Carter library about providing me some practical library experience. So far, working at the Carter has provided me with a wealth of experiences and knowledge, some of which I would like to share with you – and I might even be able to answer some of those “How does it work” questions I posed above.

For my first post, allow me to give you a brief description of how the museum selects what resources are purchased and then added to the collection. There is a document that states a broad collection development policy. It's the tool that guides what the library collects. Though it offers some solid boundaries, it must also be flexible enough to accommodate new subject matter that may relate to new art entering the collection or special research projects. Any of the staff members (including curatorial staff) can propose the purchase of a book, but the final “veto” power rests with Sam, as he is the library director. Individual librarians have influenced the document as well, with their interests and their quest to expand the collection of the library in a meaningful way. These purchases can be sourced from any number of businesses, from ones we use every day – Amazon – to specialized rare book dealers. If an item falls within the areas outlined by the collection development policy, then the subject is researched to see if it will fit into the collection of resources we have here. If it does, then the item is purchased and integrated into the collection.

We also receive a great number of books which are gifts, or books that are sent in exchange by other museums. When the Carter exchanges books with another museum, generally we will send them exhibition catalogues they are interested in, and in exchange they will send us the books we want that the other museum has published. As I mentioned above, we have some very generous donors that give books outright to the library frequently. These gifts are recorded, and then they are researched to see if they fit into out collection.

Depending upon the size of the item purchased, it might simply go into the extensive bio files and skip the next step in the process altogether. However, if Sam, Jon, or Mary Jane think it best, the item will go on to the next step in the process.

What happens to the book next? Do we just put it on the shelf and leave it be? This question will be answered in the next post, which will take you through part of the behind the scenes area in the library. I hope you enjoyed this small look into the library, and I also hope you’ll keep checking “The N-Files” blog, as there is some great information about this wonderful library on the blog.


Jason Dean