Fear No Art

I Wish My Summer Could Look Like This...

William Merritt Chase (1849–1916), Idle Hours, ca. 1894, Oil on canvas, 1982.1

William Merritt Chase (1849–1916), Idle Hours, ca. 1894, oil on canvas, 1982.1

Laura Gilpin, (1891–1979), [Summer Carnival] [Colorado Springs, Colorado], June 1941, Gelatin silver print, © 1979 Amon Carter Museum, Bequest of the artist, P1979.102.27

Laura Gilpin, (1891–1979), [Summer Carnival] [Colorado Springs, Colorado], June 1941, Gelatin silver print, © 1979 Amon Carter Museum, Bequest of the artist, P1979.102.27

Keith Carter (b.1948), Fireflies, 1992, Gelatin silver print, ©1992 Keith Carter, P2000.4

Keith Carter (b.1948), Fireflies, 1992, Gelatin silver print, ©1992 Keith Carter, P2000.4

Have a wonderful summer!

Happy Memorial Day

Today we honor the men and women who have given their lives to ensure our freedom. One day out of a year seems hardly fitting for such a sacrifice, including those made by the families of the fallen.

Here are two works from our collection that speak to the human experience of separation and loss.

George Bellows (1882–1925), Prepare, America!, 1916, Lithograph, Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas,  1985.202

George Bellows (1882–1925),
Prepare, America!, 1916
Lithograph
Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas,
1985.202

Albert E. Schaaf (1866–1950), Armistice Morning--Fifth Avenue, 1918, Bromoil print, Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas, P1986.34

Albert E. Schaaf (1866–1950)
Armistice Morning--Fifth Avenue, 1918
Bromoil print
Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas
P1986.34

Although Armistice Day and Memorial Day are two different occasions, this work is one that resonates with everyone who has lost someone to war.

To honor military personnel, the Carter is pleased to participate in the 2010 Blue Star Museums Program. Participating institutions offer free admission to active military families all summer in a new partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts. Since admission is always free to the Carter’s permanent collection and special exhibitions of American art, members of the military will receive a complimentary souvenir collection catalogue during their visit to the Carter between Memorial Day and Labor Day. To receive your catalogue, simply present your military ID to a Visitor Services Representative at the museum’s Information Desk. For more information, including other participating institutions, click here.

New Parent's Tour Reminder

Send yourself - and your baby - to the Carter for a time out and learn something interesting about the art in our collection. No sitting in the corner this Friday, just opportunities to discuss art and life-in-general with your fellow new parents.

Laura Gilpin (1891--1979), Navaho Twins [Edith's Babies] [Near Betatakin, Arizona], September 1953, gelatin silver print, © 1979 Amon Carter Museum, Bequest of the artist

Laura Gilpin (1891–1979)
Navaho Twins [Edith's Babies] [Near Betatakin, Arizona], September 1953
Gelatine silver print
© 1979 Amon Carter Museum, Bequest of the artist

Don’t forget that free parking is still available in the museum’s parking lot off of Camp Bowie. To access the museum with your stroller, please come to the elevator next to the loading dock on the north side of the museum. Someone will be there to assist you and bring you into the museum.

Call 817.989.5030 or e-mail education@cartermuseum.org with questions about this or any program at the Carter.

Program Alert - Science Meets Art!

Deep in my heart I’m a nerd. I love to watch science shows, even when I’m not exactly sure what is being discussed. This Saturday presents the perfect public program for my science-geek side and my inner-librarian, with beautiful art on view as a juicy bonus.

Cyntia Karnes, senior paper conservator at the Library of Congress, will offer insight into the art of John Marin, an artist from our permanent collection and part of our special exhibition American Moderns on Paper: Masterworks from the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art. Ms. Karnes has completed a technical examination of Marin’s watercolors and will share her views on the influences on Marin’s work.

Admission is free, but because seating is limited, reservations are required. Call 817.989.5030 or e-mail education@cartermuseum.org to register.

John Marin, Movement No. 3, Related to Downtown New York, 1926, Opaque and transparent watercolor over charcoal on thick wove paper, © Estate of John Marin/ Artist Rights Society (ARS)

John Marin (1870–1953)
Movement No. 3, Related to Downtown New York, 1926
Opaque and transparent watercolor over charcoal on thick wove paper
© Estate of John Marin/ Artist Rights Society (ARS)
Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, Hartford, CT; Gift of James L. Goodwin and Henry Sage Goodwin from the Estate of Philip L. Goodwin, 1958.229

Congratulations Graduates

No matter what your age”¦

Artist Unknown , Laura Gilpin, Receiving an Honorary Ph. D. Colorado College, ca. 1970’s, Dye coupler print (Type C), Bequest of Laura Gilpin
Artist Unknown , Laura Gilpin, Receiving an Honorary Ph. D. Colorado College, ca. 1970’s, Dye coupler print (Type C), Bequest of Laura Gilpin

or where you go to school”¦

Skeet McAuley, Hogan-Shaped Administration Building, Navajo Community College, Tsaile, Arizona, 1984, Dye destruction print
Skeet McAuley, Hogan-Shaped Administration Building, Navajo Community College, Tsaile, Arizona, 1984, Dye destruction print

Congratulations to all graduates!

Museums and Social Justice

A few weeks ago I attended the annual conference of the National Art Education Association in Baltimore, where the theme was Art and Social Justice. I must admit that I rarely pay attention to a conference’s theme, but this year was different because social justice is one of my personal passions. Carter educator Sara Klein and I had the opportunity to showcase the Carter’s accessible programs and programs for non-traditional audiences through sessions presented to museum educators across the country, and we gained inspiration by viewing the amazing artworks at the American Visionary Art Museum, which was founded on the principle that art and social justice are inextricably linked.

As an American art museum, I believe that we are perfectly suited to making social justice a priority. Our education programs at the Carter often serve to promote social justice (for example, by making our collection accessible to as many audiences as possible) or feature a social justice theme (like educator workshops centered on immigration). Likewise, many artists in our collection have created poignant visual responses to important social issues. Here are some of the works that strongly resonate with me:

Lewis Hine, Looking for Lost Baggage, Ellis Island, 1905

Lewis Hine (1874--1940), Looking for Lost Baggage, Ellis Island, 1905, gelatin silver print, P1981.80.1

Robert Glenn Ketchum, CVNRA, #125 (a toxic waterfall in a national recreation area), 1986

Robert Glenn Ketchum (b. 1947), CVNRA, #125 (a toxic waterfall in a national recreation area), 1986, from the project "Overlooked in America: The Success and Failure of Federal Land Management," dye destruction print, gift of Advocacy Arts Foundation, ©1986 Robert Glenn Ketchum, P1996.22.3

Reginald Marsh, Bread Line---No One Has Starved, 1932

Reginald Marsh (1898--1954), Bread Line---No One Has Starved, 1932, etching, 1983.83

James Karales, Passive Resistance Training, SNCC, 1960

James Karales (1930--2002), Passive Resistance Training, SNCC, 1960, gelatin silver print, © Monica Karales, P2008.18

Social justice is often achieved through dialogue. Make your voice heard about museums and social justice by posting a comment below.

Food for Thought

This short film came across my desktop this week and made me stop and think about the nature of art and how it is perceived. The video comes from a school in Liverpool, England, and is one of a series of films featuring art that is installed in their school. I found this especially interesting because the artist being discussed, Dan Flavin, has one of his works installed at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth. Why not stop by the Modern and form your own conclusions about this artist?

After you view this film, drop by the Carter and make up your own mind about what makes art great and why you like/dislike it. Add your comment to our blog so we can be part of the conversation!

Sedrick Huckaby at the Carter Tonight

Well, today is the day of our program, Pacesetters in American Art and Culture!

I mentioned the program and two of our speakers, Kimberly Davenport and Tyler Green, in earlier posts, so last but not least, let’s talk about Sedrick Huckaby.

When searching out possibilities, we really wanted to include an artist. We wanted someone who has credentials on multiple levels: schooling, practice, and street cred. Sedrick has all of that. In fact, as his name came up, we realized we had an invitation to an opening of his on our desk, and we had just heard him on the radio. I have included images of a few of his paintings.

Sedrick received his B.FA. from Boston University, his M.F.A from Yale, and also studied at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Skowhegan, Maine. Sedrick has had over twenty solo exhibitions all over the country and has participated in at least fifty group exhibitions. He has lectured and participated in discussions at the Trinity Arts conference in Dallas, TX; the Kimbell Museum; the Dallas Museum of Art; the African American Museum in Dallas; Texas, Rush Art, New York, New York; and more.

His work is held in numerous collections including the African American Museum, Dallas, TX; the Fort Worth Central Library; the McNay Art Museum in San Antonio, Texas; The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, New York.

Sedrick has won many awards including a Phillip Morris Fellowship, the Lewis Comfort Tiffany Award, the Dallas Museum of Art’s Anne Giles Kimbrough Grant, the Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptors Grant Program award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship Award. Sedrick is represented by Valley House Gallery & Sculpture Garden in Dallas, TX. When I spoke with Sedrick on the phone, I learned that he is teaching some art classes at the University of Texas at Arlington.
My favorite thing about Sedrick Huckaby is that he is a local guy living right here in Fort Worth.

Sedric Huckaby, A Love Supreme 2 Summer, Photo by Michael Bodycomb.jpg

A Love Supreme 2 Summer
Photo by Michael Bodycomb

Sedrick Huckaby, Big Momma Portrait, Photoby Michael Bodycomb.jpg

Big Momma Portrait
Photo by Michael Bodycomb

So, all in all we have an art critic from D.C., a gallery Director from Houston, and an artist from Fort Worth. Come and hear what they have to say during tonight’s program, Pacesetters in American Art and Culture.
Admission is free, but because seating is limited, reservations are required. Call 817.989.5030 to register.

Tyler Green at the Carter

This Thursday, March 25, come to our panel discussion, Pacesetters in American Art and Culture! Last week I wrote about the inspiration of this program and introduced one of our three panelists, Kimberly Davenport.

Today, I want to talk about Tyler Green. Tyler Green is an art critic based in D.C. who has a blog called Modern Art Notes (MAN). If you follow our blog, chances are you have read his! He has a readership of over 10,000 unique readers per week and covers a variety of topics, exhibitions, and interesting occurrences in the art world, including one of my favorites---the Super Bowl wager between the Indianapolis Museum of Art’s director Max Anderson and the New Orleans Museum of Art’s director E. John Bullard.

Photograph of art critic Tyler Green

Tyler is a natural fit for this program because our staff reads his blog and, frankly, are interested in what he has to say---and feel the art world is as well. His writing can be friendly, fierce, informative, and persuasive, which makes me feel there is something for everyone---it’s a nice surprise to see what’s next. The Wall Street Journal has called MAN “the most influential of all visual arts blogs,” and newspapers such as the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and the Wall Street Journal have all credited MAN with breaking stories that they later covered.

Tyler has an extensive resume. He has written for Fortune, Conde Nast Portfolio, Smithsonian, Washingtonian, the New York Observer, LA Weekly, Black Book magazine, and more. He has served as an art critic for Artnet Magazine and Bloomberg News, regularly lectures about art, and was named by the Washington Post in 2008 as one of fourteen young and influential cultural figures active in Washington, D.C. He also lectures regularly about art, including at the Brooklyn Museum, the Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art, George Washington University, Detroit’s College for Creative Studies, Artissima in Turin, Italy, and more than I can name here.

All this, and I heard a rumor that he used to be a sports writer!

There is still room to come and see the man behind the blog during our free public program Pacesetters in American Art and Culture! Admission is free, but because seating is limited, reservations are required. Call 817.989.5030 or e-mail education@cartermuseum.org to register.

Public Program Alert

I am very excited to announce our upcoming program Pacesetters in American Art and Culture on March 25. This program was inspired by the special exhibition American Moderns on Paper: Masterworks from the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art on display through May 30.

To fully understand the inspiration for this program, we must look to A. Everett “Chick” Austin Jr. He was a dynamic man who became director of the Wadsworth Atheneum (from which this exhibition hails) in 1927 at the young age of 26. From there he threw lavish parties, helped introduce America to modern art, and energized all who came in contact with him–a true pacesetter in American art. His legacy for collecting new and cutting-edge work continues at the Wadsworth. Last week we held a book club to learn more about Chick Austin (and four others)with the book Patron Saints: Five Rebels Who opened America to a New Art, 1928–1943.

We thought it would be great to showcase individuals who we feel are pacesetters today in the arts and humanities and bring them together to speak about what drives their creativity and how they continue to make innovative and energetic contributions to the arts and humanities as their careers progress.

Leading up to the program on March 25, I will offer a brief introduction to each panelist and explain why we chose them. Our panelists are Kimberly Davenport, Tyler Green, and Sedrick Huckaby.

I first came across Kimberly Davenport about four years ago while visiting a friend in Houston. I heard of the innovative exhibitions at the Rice Gallery (where she is Director) and learned that it is strictly a site specific installation gallery where artists come and create, celebrate, and then tear it all down. This is not the norm for university galleries! Many university galleries house local and some nationally-known artists, a faculty exhibition, senior exhibitions, and then start the rotation over again the next school year. It seems to be the mold that works, and quite well in many places. But, when Davenport became Director of Rice Gallery, she broke the mold. She believed in her dream for Rice Gallery, and the powers that be believed in her. Since starting in 1994, she not only developed the vision and artistic direction for Rice Gallery, but also serves as its curator.

As we began brainstorming potential pacesetters for this upcoming program, Davenport immediately came to mind. Some internet searching revealed that she has had a very interesting career path prior to starting at Rice Gallery. She has also worked as a muralist in Baltimore, was curator of contemporary art at the Wadsworth Atheneum (where our current exhibition is from), and earned a graduate degree in divinity from Yale University. While at Yale, she worked as a graduate assistant for the Department of European and Contemporary Art at the Yale University Art Gallery and was hired on as staff after graduation.

Today, in addition to her duties at Rice Gallery, Davenport is a National Peer of the Design Excellence Program of the United States General Services Administration, and in 2007 served as a member of the GSA’s national Design Awards jury. She is a member of the University of Houston Public Art Committee, as well as the Houston Museum District Association, where she serves as vice president of the board. She holds degrees from the Maryland Institute College of Art and Yale University.

Come and hear more about Kimberly Davenport during our free public program Pacesetters in American Art and Culture and learn about what gets her motivated, how she handles obstacles, and how she continues to grow and change with the arts.

Stay tuned to learn more about our other two panelists!

Admission is free, but because seating is limited, reservations are required. Call 817.989.5030 or e-mail education@cartermuseum.org to register.

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Kimberly Davenport and El Anatsui in front of his site-specific installation Gli, 2010, Photo: Nash Baker