Current Exhibitions

June 4, 2016August 21, 2016

This is the first comprehensive museum exhibition on Norman Lewis (1909–1979), which explores his influential role in American art from the 1930s through the 1970s. Lewis was a pivotal figure in the Harlem art community and the abstract expressionist movement; he was also a politically conscious activist who was able to reflect the currents of the civil rights movement in his abstract work.

April 30, 2016October 9, 2016

Identity explores how identity in American culture is often as much about how people present themselves to the world as it is externally determined. Exploring community, celebrity, and individual identity through portraiture from the Amon Carter’s permanent collection, the exhibition highlights the exciting new acquisitions of Sedrick Huckaby’s The 99% and Glenn Ligon’s print series Runaways.

March 3, 2016August 7, 2016

This inaugural presentation of renowned photographer Anthony Hernandez’s newest project evocatively explores Americans’ penchant for discarding what we no longer want through images of buildings, people, and the land east and northeast of Los Angeles, California. Despite their challenging subject, these large photographs lure us in with their light-struck atmosphere, color, and space.

“Hernandez has an incredible eye for composing images that draw viewers in.”
Star-Telegram

#ACMhernandez

February 17, 2016July 31, 2016

This installation of lithographs features works by sculptor Louise Nevelson (1899–1988) created between 1963 and 1967 at the Tamarind Lithography Workshop in Los Angeles. These prints share with her sculpture an interest in silhouetted forms and the layering of elements, but distinguish themselves by their vivid color.

October 16, 2015September 25, 2016

Texas Folk Art features the spirited work of some of the state’s most original painters and sculptors, including H. O. Kelly, Reverend Johnnie Swearingen, Velox Ward, and Clara McDonald Williamson, among others. Developing their own styles, these artists were unfettered by the conventions of academic training and traditional guidelines of art making. Lively storytelling was their primary focus, and they used any pictorial means necessary to create animated narratives about working, playing, and worshipping in Texas.