Distance Learning

Videoconference programs align with Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills and National Standards.

For more information about programs or scheduling, email distancelearning@cartermuseum.org or call 817.989.5038. For technical assistance or to ask questions about connectivity options, contact Lori Hamm at 817.740.7616 or lhamm@esc11.net.

Our distance learning programs are live, two-way audio and video programs that bring the museum to your classroom. Focusing on the Amon Carter’s collection of American art, the programs engage students and teachers with museum staff in discussions and activities exploring art, history, culture, language arts, and science.

Art-for-All Scholarship Program

In keeping with the Amon Carter’s mission to serve an educational role and to fulfill the wish of the museum’s founder, Amon G. Carter Sr., to have fine American art freely accessible to all, our scholarship program provides funding for select schools to receive free videoconferences. A limited number of interactive videoconferences and associated materials will be provided at no cost to eligible schools nationwide that have reciprocal equipment but do not have program funding.

Art-for-All Scholarship Application

Videoconferences for Students

Most programs are accompanied by pre-broadcast activities that facilitate participation during the broadcast. You receive these by mail in advance of the scheduled program date. Additional information and supporting lesson plans for many of these programs are available at http://www.cartermuseum.org/learn/online-projects.

  • American Impressionism (grades 6–12)
    History, Visual Arts
    By viewing and discussing artworks by Mary Cassatt, William Merritt Chase, Childe Hassam, John Singer Sargent, and others, students discover how the advent of American Impressionism was more than just an imitation of the impressionist movement in France. The basic tenets of Impressionism, as well as the historical and cultural influences of the time, are discussed in this program.
  • Art of the American West (grades 6–12)
    History, Social Studies, Visual Arts
    This program brings American history to life! Working with images, students analyze the ways in which important artists have interpreted the western United States during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This program promotes and improves students’ observation and critical thinking skills while making connections between art and history. After the videoconference, continue exploring the theme by using supporting lesson plans from the Amon Carter’s online teaching guide Inspiring Visions: Artists’ Views of the American West.
  • Art Meets Math (grades 1–7)
    Math, Visual Arts
    Use art to make math meaningful and fun. Using visual analysis, students explore the vocabulary and processes associated with the math concepts of your choice. To meet the needs of varied learning styles, the museum educator layers a lively, interactive, inquiry-based discussion of art between a hefty dose of math vocabulary and process reinforcement. Allow the museum educator three weeks to develop a program to introduce the topics of your choice or as a reinforcement/culminating activity for any math unit.
  • Art Work (grades 4–12)
    History, Language Arts, Science, Social Studies, Visual Arts
    Students travel behind the scenes and learn about fascinating career opportunities in an art museum. They interact with art professionals from various museum departments and make connections between the skills and knowledge needed to work in the arts and what they are learning in the core content areas of their curriculum.
  • Beautiful Biomes (grades 2–5)
    Science, Visual Arts
    Science and art intersect as students creatively use works by renowned nature photographer Eliot Porter to broaden their understanding of scientific processes, identify and describe the environmental regions of the world, and discuss plant and animal adaptations. After the videoconference, continue exploring the theme by using supporting lesson plans from the Amon Carter’s online teaching guide Eliot Porter: The Color of Wildness.
  • Bring on the May Flowers (grades 1–6)
    Science, Visual Arts
    Virtually visit the galleries of the Amon Carter and view the paintings, prints, sculpture, and photographs that depict flowers. Works by Robert Laurent, Georgia O’Keeffe, Eliot Porter, and Julian Onderdonk, who painted hundreds of Texas landscapes filled with bluebonnets, are introduced. Participants compare and contrast various styles and subjects of the artworks and discover a wide range of artistic interpretations of living things. The program requires paper and colored pencils, markers, or crayons for a sketching activity.
  • Cowboy Close-Up (grades K–6)
    Language Arts, Social Studies, Visual Arts
    The photographs of Erwin E. Smith, along with the paintings and sculpture of Frederic Remington and Charles M. Russell, are viewed as primary sources that tell the story of the American cowboy during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Students experience the lifestyle of a cowboy through the eyes and words of a historical reenactor as they watch video clips that include an authentic chuck wagon. After the videoconference, continue exploring the theme by using supporting lesson plans from the Amon Carter’s online teaching guide Erwin E. Smith: The Cowboy Photographer.
  • Encountering Texas (grades 3–7)
    History, Language Arts, Social Studies, Visual Arts
    Students explore Texas through the eyes of three artists who joined the vast migration of Americans headed to the newly formed state in the 1840s and 1850s. These Texas newcomers recorded their individual observations of the young state in delicate watercolors and drawings. After the videoconference, continue exploring the theme by using supporting lesson plans from the Amon Carter’s online teaching guide Encountering Texas: 1846–56.
  • The Fine Art of Reading—Part 1, Making Connections and Questioning
    Use fine art to supplement reading instruction and allow students to practice comprehension strategies in a text-free environment before practicing the same skill using related text. This program is one of a series of three that reinforces six strategies used by proficient readers to construct meaning. Teachers may choose to book any program in the series or all three, depending on student need. In Part 1 students view and discuss art in the virtual museum environment, making art-to-self, art-to-art, and art-to-world connections. These same connections are then made using poetry, narrative, and expository text. First with art, then with text, students also develop questioning strategies to focus their attention, clarify meaning, speculate about the unknown, and determine artist or author intent. Students also come to understand that many questions are not answered specifically, but left to the viewer’s or reader’s interpretation.
  • The Fine Art of Reading—Part 2, Visualizing and Inferring
    Use fine art to supplement reading instruction and allow students to practice comprehension strategies in a text-free environment before practicing the same skill using related text. This program is one of a series of three that reinforces six strategies used by proficient readers to construct meaning. Teachers may choose to book any program in the series or all three, depending on student need. In Part 2 students view, discuss, and sketch in the virtual museum environment. Students sketch first while viewing art and next while reading or listening to poetry, narrative, or expository text. Students gain an awareness of the importance of visualizing while reading to assist in drawing conclusions, creating interpretations, and recalling details. To develop or refine the ability to make inferences with fine art and text, students practice constructing meaning that is not explicitly revealed visually in the art or clearly stated in the text. Participants learn to combine what they already know with the artwork they see and the text they read to make analytical judgments and form continually evolving inferences
  • The Fine Art of Reading—Part 3, Determining Importance and Synthesizing
    Use fine art to supplement reading instruction and allow students to practice comprehension strategies in a text-free environment before practicing the same skill using related text. This program is one of a series of three that reinforces six strategies used by proficient readers to construct meaning. Teachers may choose to book any program in the series or all three, depending on student need. In Part 3 students develop skill in determining importance first in art and then while reading or listening to poetry, narrative, or expository text. Through visual analysis, students identify areas of emphasis in an art object and find evidence to support their thinking. Then, with the written word, students learn to make decisions and defend their positions about importance at the word, sentence, and full text level. The concept of synthesis will be illustrated using artworks that feature quilts. Participants then create a quilt, a simple visual reminder of the mental activities involved in synthesizing while viewing art or reading text.
  • Harvest Art (grades 2–6)
    Math, Social Studies, Visual Arts
    Discover why farmers are sometimes referred to as pattern-makers. Discuss the artistic qualities and geometric designs of plowed fields, stacked produce, and towering grain elevators. Create a farm web that incorporates concepts associated with free enterprise. During the lesson, students have an opportunity to make decisions and solve both social and mathematical problems.
  • How to Make an Artist (grades pre-K–2)
    Language Arts, Visual Arts
    Students are introduced to artists and their work through picture-book biographies and discussion. During the program, students create art in the styles of Georgia O’Keeffe and Frederic Remington.
  • Images of American Indians (grades 3–5)
    Social Studies, Visual Arts
    In addition to developing an appreciation for fine art while learning more about the culture of American Indians, this program develops students’ critical thinking skills.
  • Language of Art (grades 2–12)
    Language Arts, Social Studies, Visual Arts
    Students discover how artists convey ideas, create expression, and organize compositions through the use of the elements of art and principles of design. Through interactive dialogue, students learn art vocabulary and practice speaking the “language of art."
  • Let Freedom Ring (grades 2–8)
    History, Social Studies, Visual Arts
    Investigate works illustrating the concepts of personal freedom and the struggle for equality. Students discuss and put in historical perspective works from the late Harlem Renaissance and civil rights eras, including two portraits of Martin Luther King Jr. and a Jacob Lawrence print depicting a protest march. Both content and the artistic process (printmaking) are explored. The program concludes with a printmaking activity.
  • Metaphorically Seeing---It’s All About Me (grades 6–12)
    Language Arts, Visual Arts
    Students explore portraiture, refine their knowledge of metaphors and symbolism, and experience the use of figurative language in writing and visual media.
  • A New View of Black History (grades 2–12)
    History, Language Arts, Social Studies, Visual Arts
    Through the colorful, rhythmic paintings of William H. Johnson, students explore the lifestyles, struggles, and spirituality of African-Americans in the United States during the early twentieth century. Accompanying activities strengthen students’ observation and writing skills and increase their awareness of important African-Americans.
  • Painters and Place (grades 8–12)
    History, Visual Arts
    This virtual gallery tour and interactive discussion focuses on how Stuart Davis, Marsden Hartley, Georgia O’Keeffe, and other well-known American artists of the early twentieth century were inspired by each other and their surroundings.
  • Passport to Planet EARTH (grades 1–5)
    Language Arts, Science, Visual Arts
    See the art; save the Earth! Students "tour" the country—from the mountains of Upstate New York to the southwestern desert—and travel back in time to witness the first visions of the conservation movement as seen in an extraordinary nineteenth-century painting. Participating students each receive authentic-looking passports that include writing and sketching activities.
  • Picturing History Through Art (grades 5–12, including Advanced Placement)
    History, Social Studies, Visual Arts
    Students examine the ways that works of art illustrate, or were influenced by, events that shaped American history during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
  • Say It Like You See It (grades 3–9)
    Language Arts, Visual Arts
    Students practice the art of “showing” the reader an object—describing it in such a way as to paint the object with words. Through writing and sharing activities, students describe events, objects, people, and places using a vivid, active vocabulary, and then apply descriptive writing strategies to create labels for paintings from the Amon Carter’s collection.
  • The Snow Show (grades K–6)
    Math, Science, Visual Arts
    Students investigate the scientific and mathematical intricacies of individual snowflakes while viewing and discussing how American artists have depicted the beauty and wonder of snow and ice. Students also learn to create delicate six-pointed snowflakes.
  • So You Think You Saw What Happened (grades 2–8)
    Critical Thinking, Visual Arts
    Enliven your language arts and science instruction while motivating your students to discover the important details in works of art. During this art-based interactive videoconference with connections to forensic science, students will take a gallery tour; view, sketch, discuss, and record details in American masterpieces; and solve mysteries within the art.
  • Stories and the American West (grades 4–7)
    Language Arts, Visual Arts
    This program uses art as a stimulus for students to create their own personal narratives about the American West. Participating teachers receive a CD of digital images and creative writing activities to reinforce the theme after the broadcast.
  • Texas Bird’s-Eye Views (grades 3–12)
    History, Social Studies, Visual Arts
    From 1871 to 1891, a handful of artists crisscrossed Texas producing large and highly detailed bird’s-eye views of burgeoning cities and towns. Students analyze these remarkable images and explore the growth and development of nineteenth-century Texas towns and cities. After the videoconference, continue exploring the theme by using supporting lesson plans from the Amon Carter’s online teaching guide Texas Bird’s-Eye Views.

Scheduling and Connectivity

Search and register for upcoming programs on the calendars at http://www.connect2texas.net and http://www.cilc.net. If you do not see your desired program on a calendar, you may request student programs at your preferred day and time by contacting distancelearning@cartermuseum.org or 817.989.5038.

Customized programs on other topics related to the Amon Carter’s collection and special exhibitions may be requested.

If your school or other organization doesn’t have H.323 equipment, and you wish to participate in a videoconference with the Amon Carter, you may work with the museum and Connect2Texas to receive a program using your computer, a web cam, and an echo-canceling microphone. Contact distancelearning@cartermuseum.org or lhamm@esc11.net to learn more.

Fees

Student programs are $100 for a one-hour program for up to thirty students. Discounts apply when multiple programs are booked simultaneously. All schools outside Texas are responsible for their own line charges.

A limited number of interactive videoconferences and associated materials will be provided at no cost to eligible schools nationwide that have reciprocal equipment but do not have program funding.

Art-for-All Scholarship Application

Videoconferences for Educators

Incorporate visual art into all areas of your curriculum to enliven instructional design, motivate students, and increase learning. Strengthen your district’s professional development plan by scheduling your staff for an interactive videoconference with the Amon Carter. Participating teachers receive CDs with related digital images, image guides, and classroom activities tied to state and national teaching standards. For more information (including descriptions, titles, and fee structure) and to schedule programs on your designated staff development dates, call 817.989.5038 or email distancelearning@cartermuseum.org.