Timeline

1907
1907

Remington working on the clay model of The Buffalo Horse in his New Rochelle, New York studio.

Ca. 1907

Studio portrait of Augustus Thomas, inscribed to Remington.

1907

Studio portrait of Augustus Thomas, inscribed to Remington.

1908
January 16

Remington goes into New York City and views his bronzes on display at the Metropolitan Museum, and viewed an exhibition of the work of the impressionist painter Robert Reid. He noted in his diary: “By gad a fellow has got to race to keep up nowadays—the pace is fast. Small canvases are best—all plein air color and outlines lost—hard outlines are the bane of old painters.”

March 20

Remington spends the day at Roman Bronze Works retouching the wax models for The Cowboy and The Rattlesnake. Later that day he writes Leslie Miller, Secretary of the Fairmount Park Art Association: “I today finished the lost wax—retouching on the minor accoutrements [of The Cowboy], and the big thing is steaming away in the melting furnaces.

April

Remington writes Leslie Miller, Secretary of the Fairmount Park Art Association: “The casting [of The Cowboy] has been wholly successful and there is a lot more character in it than in the plaster which is what one can do with ‘lost wax.’ In the old piece mold [sand cast process] the plaster ends it, but in wax one can go on as far as he likes. I went over every inch of the wax.

April 27

Remington copyrights his only monumental outdoor sculpture, The Cowboy, to be unveiled on June 20 in Fairmont Park in Philadelphia.

June 3

Remington formally puts Ingleneuk up for sale.

June 20

Remington’s monumental statue of The Cowboy is formally unveiled in Fairmont Park in Philadelphia.

June 22

Remington notes in his diary: “Six painted in studio and I have now discovered for the first time how to do the silver sheen of moonlight.”

June 25

Remington writes Leslie Miller, Secretary of the Fairmount Park Art Association: “That model I knew would never look right until in place. Some more solemn & reposeful thing might defend itself in a foundry but that cow-boy had to be on the bluff he was intended for. The ceremonies of unveiling were unique and creditable to your people who conceived the enterprise. I hope now someone will let me do an Indian and a Plains cavalryman and then I will be ready for glory.

June 29

Remington notes in his diary that he received “a very considerate letter from Collier saying he would have to let me go in January as they had $20,000 worth of my drawings. I had expected that the enemy has been too strong for me but I stayed with them for a while. Wrote him thanking him for the long notice. Collier Weekly has run down and I guess they found it hard to get back in circulation.”

July 2

A.G. Hetherington, a member of the Fairmount Park Art Association who commissioned the bronze statue of The Cowboy, writes Remington: “It was a great pleasure for me to have charge of the details and was most fortunate in getting the Cowboys and Indians. No statue was seen unveiled with more appropriate ceremonies. I wish you could have seen the picture—it was much like one of your own. He Dog the Chief who pulled the rope has been ever since the proudest Indian possible. When I saw your modest letter on Mr. Miller’s desk saying you “would not be here but it made no difference as no one paid much attention to the sculptor” I resolved that all the praise should be given you in our newspapers and set to work. I send you today the clippings… It is to tell the million and one half inhabitants of Philadelphia—"Remington’s Mounted Cowboy” and thousands have gone to see it and all are moved. I consider it one of the great statues of the world.”

September 7

The Remingtons return to New Rochelle.

September 8

Remington travels by rail to Chicago and on to Wyoming.

September 19

Remington arrives in Cody, Wyoming, and sets off in a wagon for Buffalo Bill’s T.E. Ranch, camping along the way.

September 29

Remington arrives back in New York.

December 1

Remington goes out to his new property for a home and studio in Ridgefield, Connecticut, and notes that the foundations of the house are finished.

December 1-12

Remington exhibits nineteen works at the Knoedler Galleries, including five pure landscape studies—the first he has ever exhibited; two of the paintings are The Grass Fire (ACM) and The Long Horn Cattle Sign (ACM).

December 5

Remington notes in his diary that “Grass Fire sold today;” the selling price is $1000.

December 12

Remington notes in his diary: “My show at Knoedler’s closes tonight. It was a triumph. I have landed among the painters and well up too.”

December 22

Remington notes in his diary: “A man named Fisher, Greenwich NY wants to sell my early painting ‘The Missionary’—thus my early enemies come to haunt me. I am helpless. I would buy them all if I were able to burn them up.”

December 26

Remington notes in his diary: “Ridgefield—early start, fine day… Fine view of my house leaving Ridgefield. It is stunning—better than I hoped, ready for shingles. Working on chimneys. We are tickled to death—with view—my studio window is magnificent.”

Ca. 1908

Studio portrait of Remington with a bowler hat, blowing cigar smoke; photo by Davis and Sanford, New York City

Ca. 1908

Studio portrait of Remington with a hat, gloves, and coat; photo by Davis and Sanford, New York City

Ca. 1908

Remington standing in front of the fireplace in his studio in New Rochelle, New York.

Ca. 1908

Studio portrait of Remington; photo by Davis and Sanford, New York City

1908

Remington’s monumental statue, The Cowboy, Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, shortly after its completion.

Ca. 1908

Studio portrait of Remington.

Ca. 1908

Studio portrait of Remington with hat, gloves, and coat; photo by Davis and Sanford, New York City

1909
January 1

Remington’s contract with Collier’s is terminated; he notes in his diary that “I am fired… I am no longer on a salary and [am] fully embarked on the uncertain career of a painter.”

January 8-20

Remington exhibits sixteen paintings at the Doll & Richards Gallery, Boston; one of the paintings is The Long Horn Cattle Sign (ACM).

January 14

Remington notes in his diary: “The Boston press with one exception has given me a hell of a bad turning over… They call my moonlights ‘monochromes.’ No sales. I fear Boston will never [be] crying Freddie again.”

January 21

Remington writes to his boyhood friend John Howard in Ogdensburg: “You don’t know any fellow up there who wants to make an offer for my island do you. I thought there might be a great popular excitement to buy it… My show made a great hit this winter and I did pretty well. I am no longer an illustrator.

January 30

Remington notes in his diary: “Kid [Mrs. Remington] made me a painting robe—blue and big as a three-ring circus tent but it will cover me up from flying paint.”

February 15

Remington notes in his diary that he “burned up a lot of old canvases.”

February 18

Remington writes his boyhood friend John Howard in Ogdensburg that Ingleneuk Island is being sold to a new owner, Tom Strong. Howard is put in charge of packing up some personal effects from the studio. “The easel can be sent to Ridgefield sometime this spring and I will have to get you to look up the minor things and bundle them down.

March 6

Remington writes his boyhood friend John Howard about moving to his new house in Ridgefield: “The great trek begins on the 17th. It is a piece of business trucking all my plunder—19 years of damage settled on top of itself and when you break it out hundreds of things come up which we had grown not to notice.

March 16

After several weeks of packing and moving the contents of the New Rochelle house and studio, Remington notes in his diary: “Place is bare and desolate. We have lived here 19 years last March—the best days of our lives and we go with very few regrets. The charm of New Rochelle as a living place has long departed.”

May 19

Remington notes in his diary: “Clouds—sunny, I started in on my studio. It was a mass of stuff. I tore out the middle—gradually got stuff in garrett and placed my big furniture. Murphy volunteered to help me in the afternoon and by night I had my walls hung.”

June 1

Remington works for the first time in his new studio in Ridgefield.

July 30

Remington refers to his western paintings in his diary as the “Grand Frontier,” as opposed to the “small intimate Eastern” work, which are his landscape studies.

August 21

Remington notes in his diary: “I worked on my paintings and am bringing them all up to my standard. I let no picture get past me now until I cannot see a flaw.”

October 12

Remington notes in his diary: “Beautiful morning—Tel. from Childe Hassam who with his wife are at Inn… Kid [Mrs. Remington] and I over to J. Alden Weirs. His place looked fine. Saw his pictures—also his daughter’s book building. They went up to dinner Sunday. The [Kenyon] Coxs want us for dinner. The Childe Hassams over in afternoon. [Riccardo] Bertelli came at 5:16 and over to dinner—jolly evening.”

December 4-11

Remington exhibits twenty-three works at the Knoedler Gallery, and receives good critical reviews; one of the works singled out for praise is The Buffalo Runners, Big Horn Basin [Sid Richardson Collection].

December 9

Remington notes in his diary: “Worked on B.B. [The Bronco Buster, large version] and have finished same… The art critics have all ‘come down’—I have belated but splendid notes from all the papers. The[y] ungrudgingly give me a high place as a ‘mere painter.’ I have been on their trail a long while and they never surrendered while they had a leg to stand on. The ‘illustrator’ phase has become back ground. But my sales are disappointing why I don’t know.”

December 20

Remington notes in his diary: “While at work I was caught with intense pains in belly. I was afraid of stoppage of the intenstines so took a lot of Tarrants [a mild opiate] and yet I wrenched myself turning the corn sheller Saturday and I don’t know which was the trouble. I got a hole through my guts later but it put me in a wounded man’s fever and I went to bed.”

December 22

Remington tries to go into New York but the pain in his stomach forces him back to Ridgefield on the noon train, and he immediately goes to bed. He passes a very uncomfortable night.

December 23

Mrs. Remington summons a doctor, who confers with colleagues and determines that Remington’s illness is acute appendicitis; the decision is made to operate immediately right at the house, with three doctors and two nurses in attendance. Mrs. Remington writes in her husband’s diary: “When Dr. Abbe told him he must operate—he said—‘cut her loose Dr’ in his usual brave way. He had a very comfortable night considering.”

December 24

Remington spends a comfortable day in bed, but is restless.