Timeline

1902
October

Scribner’s magazine publishes a group of four paintings in color—one of them The Cowboy (ACM)—titled “Western Types;” they then issue prints of the paintings as a separate set; John Howard, Remington’s boyhood friend, acquires the painting of The Cowboy.

October 8

Remington copyrights the sculpture, Coming Through the Rye; the price for the work is $2,000, and the first cast is immediately sold, and sales averaged about two annually for the next few years.

November 12

Remington’s novel John Ermine of the Yellowstone is published by the Macmillan Company; it goes quickly into a second printing, netting Remington about $4,000 in royalties.

December

Remington enters into a discussion with the writer Louis Shipman to adapt John Ermine of the Yellowstone into a Broadway play.

Ca. 1902

Remington and an unidentified man on the dock at Ingleneuk Island, his summer home on Chippewa Bay, New York.

Ca. 1902

Eva Remington in a hisorse and buggy at Endion, New Rochelle, New York.

Ca. 1902

Remington’s summer home on Ingleneuk Island, Chippewa Bay, on the St. Lawrence River, New York.

Ca. 1902

Remington paddling his Rushton canoe in Chippewa Bay, on the St. Lawrence River.

Ca. 1902

Remington painting outdoors.

Ca. 1902

Remington clowning with Mrs. Little at his summer home on Ingleneuk Island, Chippewa Bay, New York.

Ca. 1902

Remington paddling his Rushton canoe on Chippewa Bay near Ingleneuk Island, his summer home.

Ca. 1902

Remington’s hired man, Tim Bergevin, on horseback at Endion, New Rochelle, New York.

Ca. 1902

Remington paddling his canoe on Chippewa Bay, on the St. Lawrence River, New York.

Ca. 1902

Remington’s boat house on Ingleneuk Island, his summer home on Chippewa Bay, New York.

Ca. 1902

Rear view of Endion, Remington’s home in New Rochelle, New York, showing his studio on the right.

Ca. 1902

Remington at his summer home on Ingleneuk Island, Chippewa Bay, on the St. Lawrence River.

Ca. 1902

Remington standing with an oar alongside his Rushton canoe at Ingleneuk Island, his summer home on the St. Lawrence River.

Ca. 1902

Frederic and Eva Remington on the dock of their summer home at Ingleneuk Island, Chippewa Bay, New York.

Ca. 1902

Remington’s boat house on Ingleneuk Island, his summer home on Chippewa Bay, New York.

Ca. 1902

Front view of Endion, Remington’s home in New Rochelle, New York, showing his studio on the left.

Ca. 1902

Remington resting on the porch of his studio at Ingleneuk Island, Chippewa Bay, New York.

Ca. 1902

Remington paddling his canoe on Chippewa Bay near Ingleneuk Island, his summer home on the St. Lawrence River.

Ca. 1902

Remington’s summer home on Ingleneuk Island, Chippewa Bay, New York.

Ca. 1902

Frederic and Eva Remington on the dock of their summer home at Ingleneuk Island, Chippewa Bay, New York.

1903
January

Remington begins associating with some of the members of “The Ten,” a group of American impressionist painters that includes his old teacher at the Art Students’ League, Julian Alden Weir, who introduces him to the Ridgefield, Connecticut area; he exhibits a nocturne at a group exhibition at the Union League Club.

March

Remington is profiled in Outing magazine and he has this to say about painting: “Big art is the process of elimination. Cut down and out—do your hardest work outside the picture, and let your audience take away something to think about—to imagine. Then your audience discovers the thing you held back, and that’s skill.”

April

Special Exhibition of Recent Paintings by Frederic Remington at the NoÈ Art Galleries, New York.

May

Remington signs a special four-year contract with Collier’s, unique for artists of his time; the magazine agrees to reproduce in color one painting a month from a group selected by the artist; the reproduction would not be connected to any text, but stand by itself; Remington receives a fee of $1000 per painting; the series begins in September, with the painting His First Lesson (ACM).

July 6

Remington travels from Ingleneuk to Brooklyn to adjust the wax model for his sculpture, The Mountain Man, which he copyrights four days later; he says the subject is “one of those old Iriquois [sic] trappers who followed the fur companies in the ’30 & 40’ties;” the work sells for $300, and proves very popular.

September 14

The first performance of the play, titled John Ermine, opens in Boston to lukewarm reviews.

November

The play John Ermine opens at the Manhattan Theatre in New York City; the play closes after one month, a relative failure.

1903

Two character actors in the play adaptation of Remington’s novel John Ermine of the Yellowstone.

1903

A climactic scene from the play adaptation of Remington’s John Ermine of the Yellowstone.

1903

Carl Arendt as “Crooked Bear” in the play adaptation of Remington’s novel John Ermine of the Yellowstone; photo by Windeatt, Chicago

1903

John Ermine and an old trapper in the play adaptation of Remington’s novel John Ermine of the Yellowstone.

1903

Mrs. Charlotte Walker in the role of Katherine in the play adaption of Remington’s novel John Ermine of the Yellowstone; photo by Windeatt, Chicago

1903

Hackett in the role of John Ermine in the play adaptation of Remington’s novel John Ermine of the Yellowstone; photo by Windeatt, Chicago

1903

John Ermine and his beloved in the play adaptation of Remington’s novel John Ermine of the Yellowstone.

1903

Characters in the play adaptation of Remington’s novel John Ermine of the Yellowstone.

1903

Characters in the play adaptation of Remington’s novel John Ermine of the Yellowstone.

1903

A dramatic scene from the play adaptation of Remington’s John Ermine of the Yellowstone.

1903

Perry as “Wolf Voice” in the play adaptation of Remington’s novel John Ermine of the Yellowstone; photo by Windeatt, Chicago

1903

The hero and heroine in the play adaptation of Remington’s novel John Ermine of the Yellowstone.

1904
January

Remington and his Ogdensburg friend John Howard travel to Mexico, finishing up in Chihuahua, but there is little sketching done; the artist’s obesity (nearly 300 pounds) troubles him on this trip.

February

Remington begins doing a series of paintings for Colliers on the settlement of the Louisiana Purchase territory, to tie in with the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis, where a monumental version in plaster of Coming Through the Rye is displayed with the title, Off the Trail.

March

Remington exhibits ten paintings at the NoÈ Art Galleries in New York City.

May

Remington finishes the model for his first sculpture in a non-western subject, Polo.

July 1

Remington copyrights his sculpture, Polo; the price is $1000.

July 30

Remington copyrights his sculpture, The Sergeant; Riccardo Bertelli of Roman Bronze Works had suggested the idea of doing a smaller, less expensive work; Remington terms it his “Rough Rider Sergeant,” and the work retails for $50.

November

Remington travels to Havana, Cuba, with a group of friends.