Timeline

1898
December 8

Remington copyrights his sculpture, The Scalp, also called The Triumph; eleven casts of the sand-cast version and six of the lost-wax version are eventually sold during his lifetime.

Ca. 1898

Reminton working on the clay model for The Scalp.

Ca. 1898

Good Bird, a Sioux; photo by Frank Rinehart, Omaha, Nebraska

Ca. 1898

Heap of Bears, a Sioux; photo by Frank Rinehart, Omaha, Nebraska

Ca. 1898

Kills Enemy, a Cheyenne.

Ca. 1898

Red Cloud, the Sioux Chief.

Ca. 1898

Wolf Robe, a Cheyenne chief.

Ca. 1898

Little Bear, a Cheyenne; photo by John K. Hillers

1899
April

Remington is released by Harper’s Weekly; he begins illustrating for Collier’s with a commission to be a special correspondent for a series of illustrated articles on the United States Army in Cuba; he again journeys south, this time to Havana.

May

Remington attends an exhibition at the Union League Club of the work of Charles Rollo Peters (1862-1928), and becomes interested in exploring nocturnal subjects.

July-August

Remington travels to Montana and begins sketching night scenes; he visits Buffalo Bill in Cody, Wyoming.

September 1

Remington writes Owen Wister: “Just back from two months in Montana and Wyoming—trying to paint at the impossible—had a good time—as Miss Columbia said to Uncle Sam ‘That was my war"—that old cleaning up of the West—that is the war I am going to put in the rest of my time at.

Ca. 1899

Swift Dog, a Sioux; photo by Henry Rinehart, Omaha, Nebraska

1899

Broken Arm, an Ogalala Sioux; photo by Henry Rinehart, Omaha, Nebraska

1900

At Remington’s urging his next-door neighbor, Augustus Thomas, writes a play about a western subject titled Arizona; it becomes an immediate hit when it is performed in New York.

February

Remington travels west to Yellowstone Park, Wyoming.

March

Remington begins casting sculpture utilizing the lost-wax process with Roman Bronze Works, in the Greenpoint section of Brooklyn, New York; he becomes close friends with the foundry’s owner, Riccardo Bertelli; Remington immediately begins work modeling The Norther.

April

Remington has his first experience at the Roman Bronze Works foundry making changes on the three wax models of The Norther; he is excited by the freedom it affords.

May 25

Remington buys a five-acre summer retreat, Ingleneuk Island, in Chippewa Bay on the St. Lawrence River; the artist and his wife spend the summer there, fixing up the property.

Summer

Remington writes a draft of his first novel, The Way of an Indian, and illustrates it.

June

Remington receives an honorary degree from Yale as the “most distinguished pupil” of its art school.

July 2

Remington copyrights his first sculpture made by the lost-wax process, The Norther; only three copies are planned and sold.

July

A nephew of Ingleneuk Island’s former owner visits Remington in his improvised studio and watches him paint a black-and-white oil, The Right of the Road, for Collier’s magazine.

October 16

Remington travels on a sketching trip to Colorado as a guest of the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad; he stops in Denver, then proceeds by rail on the 24th over the Rocky Mountains to Ouray in the Uncompahgre Mountains, before traveling south to sketch on the Ute reservation near Ignacio.

Ca. 1900

Remington on horseback at Endion, his home in New Rochelle, New York.

Ca. 1900

Remington’s studio at Endion, his home in New Rochelle, New York.

Ca. 1900

Remington’s studio at Endion, his home in New Rochelle, New York.

Ca. 1900

Studio portrait of Julian Ralph, inscribed to Remington; photo by William Notman and Son, Montreal

Ca. 1900

Remington’s studio at Endion, his home in New Rochelle, New York.

Ca. 1900

Frederic and Eva Remington in a Rushton canoe on the St. Lawrence River.

Ca. 1900

Remington’s studio at Endion, his home in New Rochelle, New York.

Ca. 1900

Remington’s studio at Endion, his home in New Rochelle, New York.

1901

Remington begins a more careful study of color; he creates the pastel of the Infantry Soldier as a more subtle essay in the application of color.

Remington paints his masterful oil, The Old Stage Coach of the Plains (ACM).

Throughout the year Collier’s reproduces at least two of Remington’s paintings in color each month, some as double-page spreads, sometimes marketing reproductions as separate prints 12 x 18 inches on board for $1.50.

April

Remington’s left foot is badly injured when his horse falls on it; he is confined to bed for two weeks, but it takes much longer than that for the foot to heal.

April-May

Remington begins modeling The Cheyenne, a sculpture that he described to Riccardo Bertelli at Roman Bronze Works as an “Indian & a pony which is burning the air—I think & hope he wont fall off as I did—he has a very teetery seat and I am nervous about even mud riders.”

May

The finished plaster cast from the clay model of The Cheyenne is sent to Roman Bronze Works; Remington tells Bertelli: “Glad the thing got over all right but look—You had better not put it in wax now. This Fall I will be able to get about and then I will come over and finish the thing.”

June

Remington goes to his summer home at Ingleneuk, where he has a new studio built at the northern tip of the island, with windows all along the north side to let in the even light.

September

Remington’s portfolio of eight colored pastels, reproduced as lithographs and titled A Bunch of Buckskins, is published with a fulsome introduction by Owen Wister by the R.H. Russell Company.

November 14

Theodore Roosevelt writes Remington to thank him for a complimentary copy of A Bunch of Buckskins. “It is a compliment that I greatly appreciate, and I appreciate the pictures themselves as I always do everything of yours.

November 21

Remington copyrights the sculpture, The Cheyenne; it becomes one of the artist’s most popular bronzes.

December 9-30

Remington exhibits his work at the Clausen Gallery, New York; Remington considers this to be his first exhibition as a serious artist; one reviewer declares that “Depicting night the artist is more successful.”

December 17

Remington copyrights the bronze, The Buffalo Signal, a special individual commission for a fifteen-year-old boy at Christmas; the boy writes the artist to thank him, saying that “It was the best present I got not counting an army saddle and a bridle.”

Ca. 1901

Remington at work in his summer studio at Ingleneuk Island.

1902
March 24

Remington writes Riccardo Bertelli at Roman Bronze Works to say that he has modeled “the bunch” [Coming Through the Rye], and wants someone to come up to New Rochelle and put the model in plaster. In another letter the same month he writes: “I have reconstructed the right hand man and made it much better with a foot on the ground. So—now I have six horses’ feet on the ground and 10 in the air.

April 7

Remington writes Bertelli that he has “shipped 4 boxes of [plaster] models and hope to God they arrive whole and not in small chunks.”

May-June

Remington works at the foundry on the model for Coming Through the Rye; he writes Owen Wister to say that “I go to the Roman Bronze Works—275 Green Street, Greenpoint— Brooklyn—leaving here every morning at 8:20 am to work out a four horse bronze and I reach this above oasis at 6 p.m.—eat—smoke go to bed and day after day I am to do this until I die or complete the bronze—and it’s even up.”

June-August

Remington spends time at Ingleneuk writing the draft and doing the illustrations for his novel, John Ermine of the Yellowstone.

September

Remington’s “big picture book of the West,” containing more than sixty new paintings and drawings and titled Done in the Open, is published by R.H. Russell; the title is suggested by Owen Wister, who writes the text for the book; the cover is Remington’s pastel of The Infantry Soldier (ACM); it subsequently passes through five editions.