Timeline

1888
Ca. 1888

Indian camp on the Blackfoot Reserve, Canada; photo by Notman, New York City

Ca. 1888

Photo by Remington of a stagecoach entering a western town.

Ca. 1888

Sanchez, the Apache Chief; photo by Henry Buehman, Tuscon, Arizona Territory

Ca. 1888

Remington on horseback in the Arizona Territory.

1888

Portrait of four generations of women in Geronimo’s band, 1888; photo by Reed and Warner, Mobile, Alabama

Ca. 1888

Studio portrait of Eva Remington; photo by F. Girard, Gloversville, New York

Ca. 1888

A Blackfoot man holding a tack-studded rifle, standing with his horse in front of a tipi; photo by Notman, New York City

Ca. 1888

Unidentified Apache man; photo by Henry Buehman, Tuscon, Arizona Territory

1889

Remington tells a reporter for the Denver Republican: “I never use a camera now. I haven’t for a year past. The interesting never occurs in nature as a whole, but in pieces. It’s more what I leave out than what I add.”

Remington’s earnings for 1889 exceed $11,000, placing him in the top 10 percent of Americans with the highest individual incomes.

Remington paints The Indian Trapper (ACM).

January

Remington publishes an illustrated article titled “Horses of the Plains” in The Century Magazine.

February

Remington travels to Mexico for Harper’s to make studies to illustrate Thomas A. Janvier’s “The Aztec Treasure-House”; he also makes a number of studies of the Mexican military.

March 14

Remington writes Powhatan Clarke: “I am just home from the city of Mexico where I have been doing the army. They are immensely picturesque and I have some good subjects. In your next letter write me all the facts you know concerning the operation of the Mex. regular troops in Sonora—their methods—their marching and fighting.

April 2

Remington writes Lieutenant Powhatan Clarke in Arizona: “I have a big order for a cow-boy picture [A Dash for the Timber (ACM)] and I want a lot of ‘chapperras’ [sic]—say two or three pairs—and if you will buy these of some of the cow-boys there and ship them to me by express C.O.D. I will be your slave. One pair like the drawing would be very desirable—big flaps uncut—for fringe—you have seen them. I have four pairs now and want some more and as soon as I can get them will begin the picture. There are a lot of cow-boys in your country and you ought to be able to pick them up without much trouble—also that pistol holster which I left down there. Write if you are not able to procure them and I will try elsewhere.”

June

In Canton, Remington begins work on a commission to create over 500 illustrations for a deluxe edition of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s The Song of Hiawatha.

July

Remington wins a silver medal at the Paris International Exposition for his large oil painting The Last Lull in the Fight.

September

Remington receives high praise at the National Academy of Design exhibition for his large painting A Dash for the Timber, commissioned by businessman Edmund Cogswell Converse; the New York Herald proclaims that it “marks an advance of one of the strongest of our young artists.”

December 1

Remington buys a house on three acres in New Rochelle, New York (later naming it Endion after an Ojibwa word meaning “the place where I live”). He describes it as an estate.

December

Travels with the journalist Julian Ralph to the Canadian north woods for an article in Harper’s on moose hunting.

1889

Remington and Julian Ralph posing in the photo studio as North Country Hunters.

Ca. 1889

Two vaqueros, northern Mexico.

Ca. 1889

Remington in North Country Garb posing in the studio as a hunter.

Ca. 1889

Remington and Julian Ralph standing in front of a Sibley tent.

Ca. 1889

Kicking Bear, a Sioux; photo by Henry Rinehart, Omaha, Nebraska

Ca. 1889

Vaqueros roping a steer on a ranch in northern Mexico.

Ca. 1889

Studio portrait of the artist Edward Kemble, inscribed to Remington; photo by Falk, 949 Broadway, New York City

Ca. 1889

Remington painting The Indian Trapper in his New York studio.

Ca. 1889

Remington and his friend Julian Ralph posing with guns; photo by Mrs. J. Hitchcock Photographic Studio,Ca.ton, New York

Ca. 1889

Three vaqueros, northern Mexico.

Ca. 1889

Mexican man with a pack horse.

1890

Remington exhibits two paintings at the Brooklyn Arts Club; one of the paintings, The Indian Trapper, is quickly sold.

January

Remington is invited by General Nelson A. Miles to tour California as a guest of the Army.

Remington advises the editors at Harper’s Weekly on the virtues of photoengraved reproductions of his work and immerses himself in the technical aspects of the process, working with the printers to demonstrate the superiority of photoengraved plates over those done by wood engraving.

Remington paints A Cavalryman’s Breakfast on the Plains (ACM).

April

Remington holds his first one-man exhibition and sale of his work at the American Art Galleries of the American Art Association; six of the twenty-one paintings are exhibited as privately owned.

July

Remington, Eva, and the writer Julian Ralph travel from Montreal to western Canada; they spend time at the Blackfoot reservation, where they observe and record dances and ceremonies; Harper’s New Monthly Magazine subsequently publishes six articles by Ralph with fifty-two Remington illustrations.

October

Remington travels to Montana at the invitation of General Nelson A. Miles to investigate the movements of the northern Cheyenne; befriends Lieutenant S. C. Robertson, head of the Crow scouts.

December 6

Remington’s article, “Chasing a Major-General,” appears in Harper’s Weekly; he concludes the article by saying: “Let us preserve the native American race, which is following the buffalo into painted pictures and history books.” In the same issue Remington’s article “The Art of War and Newspaper Men” appears.

December 10

Remington writes a Mr. McCormack: “You see there is a wide fundamental split between myself and the school which holds that subject matter is of no importance in painting. I believe it is.”

December 25

Remington celebrates Christmas with the soldiers and the Cheyenne scouts in Sibley tents ten miles south of Rapid City, South Dakota.

December 27

Remington’s watercolor portrait Lieutenant S.C. Robertson, Chief of Crow Scouts (ACM) accompanies his article titled “Indians as Irregular Cavalry” in Harper’s Weekly. On December 31 Robertson writes Remington: “It is not too much to say that I believe your pencil has done more for us than any other single influence I know of. Personally I am grateful to you for your last dissertation in Harper’s Weekly about Indian scouts. Your article, if I know aught about the subject myself is masterly in its conception of the whole matter.

December 30

Remington and several others narrowly escape attack by a threatening group of Brule Sioux in war paint while on their way to the Pine Ridge Agency; Remington credits Red Bear, a Cheyenne scout, for saving his life.

Ca. 1890

Studio portrait of Eva Caten Remington.

Ca. 1890

Standing Bear, the Ponca Sioux Chief; photo by C.M. Bell, Washington, D.C.

Ca. 1890

Lieutenant Marion Maus, U.S. Army; photo by Davis and Sanford, New York

Ca. 1890

A model dressed in a U.S. cavalry uniform sitting astride a barrel in front of Remington’s studio in New Rochelle, New York.

Ca. 1890

Powder Face, the Arapaho War Chief.

Ca. 1890

A model dressed in a U.S. cavalry uniform sitting astride a barrel in front of Remington’s studio in New Rochelle, New york.

Ca. 1890

Studio portrait of Remington, inscribed by him; photo by Davis and Sanford, New York City