Director of Education and Library Services

The Amon Carter Museum of American Art seeks a Director of Education and Library Services (DELS), a senior-leadership position. The DELS will have the opportunity to illuminate one of the world’s finest collections of American art, including many masterpieces, through museum interpretation, educational programs, and facilitation of research.

The DELS leads a division of the museum consisting of two departments: Education, and Library and Archives. Education provides programs for greater than 20,000 pre-K-12 students, university students, and adults; distance learning for all ages; and exhibition interpretation. Library and Archives fosters new knowledge in diverse audiences via published works and unpublished documents. Complementing the museum’s art collection, the research library offers over 150,000 items on American art, photography, and history from the early nineteenth century to the present, one of the largest collections focused on American art in the country.

As a member of the museum’s Leadership Team, the DELS contributes vision, expertise and inspiration to the formulation of strategic plans and the oversight of their fulfillment. S/he manages department staff members and coordinates their work with other divisions.

The successful candidate will be a visionary and an innovator regarding the roles of educational programming and information services in an art museum. S/he will relish collaboration with fellow professionals; fostering deep connections and fruitful collaboration between education and library services departments and other departments within the museum; and actively engaging communities beyond simply delivering products to them. S/he will have a record of successful leadership in a museum setting that includes developing engaging, effective museum programs, particularly for adults, and leading a department.

The Amon Carter Museum has been making a transition from a founder-led institution to one guided by a collegial Leadership Team consisting of the Executive Director, Chief Operating Officer/Chief Financial Officer, Director of Collections and Exhibitions, Director of Development and Communications, Director of Human Resources, and the DELS. Executive Director Andrew J. Walker and COO/CFO Scott Wilcox share authority, with the former setting the artistic direction, working with donors and providing the public face of the museum; and the latter handling administrative matters, finances and day-to-day operations. The successful DELS will embrace this organizational structure, thrive in the museum’s collaborative work environment, and lead the Education and Library Services Division through process management, mentoring, and evaluation.

PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION AND
LIBRARY SERVICES

The DELS will help provide the leadership and vision for the museum’s excellence. The DELS will serve on the museum’s Leadership Team and manage mid-level staff in the Education and Library and Archives Departments, which employ about 18 staff. S/he will maintain a working relationship with the Board of Trustees. S/he will be an ambassador to community groups and patrons and will represent the museum at national professional meetings. The DELS will work with the development department in fundraising initiatives, and will prepare and manage the departmental budgets within the Education and Library Services Division.

Responsibilities:

• Build on the museum’s reputation for educational excellence, especially in the area of pre-K-12 visits, strengthening existing programs. Oversee development of new interpretative and public programs, with particular emphasis on programs for adults.
• Oversee Library and Archives’ initiatives to expand their reach and foster new learning in service of the museum’s strategic goals, for example, through external partnerships.
• Maintain up-to-date knowledge of best practices in museum education and informational services to inform program development at the museum.
• Initiate, cultivate and maintain partnerships with such entities as schools and universities, other museums, healthcare organizations, community agencies, and libraries.
• Gather data on departmental activities and conduct effective evaluation to promote constant improvement and inform the Leadership Team.
• Represent the Education and Library Services Division on the Leadership Team, working as an effective teammate and advocate, setting strategic directions, and contributing to significant decisions for the museum.
• Develop and manage operational processes to achieve departmental objectives in fulfillment of the museum’s strategic plan.
• Foster a culture in the Education and Library Services Division of forging strong partnerships within and beyond the museum in pursuit of institutional goals.
• Perform supervisory responsibilities, managing department staff within the division.
• Recruit, interview, recommend for hire, train, and evaluate staff as needed. Ensure appropriate and effective management of staff, interns, and volunteers by mid-level staff.
• Cultivate leadership skills in departmental staff and encourage their professional growth.
• Assist the Development Department as appropriate to secure funding for museum programs and information services.
• Oversee formulation and management of Division budgets.

QUALIFICATIONS -- KNOWLEDGE, EXPERIENCE, SKILLS AND ABILITIES

• Minimum of 5 years of museum-education and management experience in a senior-management position at an art museum or similar institution, such as an American history museum with a significant art collection and strong educational programs.
• Demonstrated leadership, mentoring, and organizational skills.
a. Demonstrated ability to think strategically and creatively; experience with long-range planning for program planning and audience development.
b. The ability to manage multiple projects, work under pressure and meet deadlines.
c. Institutional perspective; able to consider and test ideas in a team setting without being wedded to one’s own.
d. Problem solving skills, both as an individual and as part of a group of peers.
e. Desire to advance into museum senior-administration and to mentor and professionally develop the Division’s professionals.
f. Possessing professional presence, with a talent for inspiring and building confidence both within the museum and outside the institution among a broad range of constituencies.
g. Passion for museum education.
h. Diplomatic. Comfortable in dynamic or challenging situations.
• Collaborative skills. Experience with or commitment to a team-oriented culture with shared responsibilities.
• Master’s degree required in art history, art, museum studies, museum education, or similar field. Degree with specialty in the field of American Art or Culture is desirable.
• Excellent communication and writing skills.
• Proficient in community interaction and cross-staff partnership building.
• Positive outlook. High energy, self-motivated, with a strong work ethic.
• Business acumen and sound financial and logistical-planning abilities.
• Computer proficiency with MS Office products.

ABOUT THE MUSEUM

After six decades of growth, the Amon Carter houses more than 200,000 paintings, photographs, prints and sculptures, among them premier works by Thomas Cole, Frederic Church, Martin Johnson Heade, Thomas Eakins, Winslow Homer, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Mary Cassatt, William Merritt Chase, Childe Hassam, Georgia O’Keeffe, Alexander Calder, Arthur Dove, Marsden Hartley, and Stuart Davis. The photography collection of 45,000 prints spans the entire history of American photography, and the museum houses the archives of eight American photographers .

History and founders
Collector Amon G. Carter (1879–1955) amassed one of the largest collections of the works of Frederic Remington and Charles Russell, and his original collection concept envisioned Western Art. On the opening of the museum, his daughter, founder Ruth Carter Stevenson (1923–2013) extended the concept to nationwide American art, and since 1961, the museum has acquired great masterworks of American art in all media. The museum also presents outstanding special exhibitions and a full calendar of public programs.

A Modern and continually expanding building
Architect Philip Johnson created an International Style 1961 building with “a grand entrance to a grand collection of American art” (http://www.cartermuseum.org/about). The building has expanded rapidly to accommodate six decades of collection and program growth. In 1964, only three years after the museum opened, a 14,250-square-foot addition provided space for offices, a bookstore, a research library, and an art-storage vault. Joseph R. Pelich (1894-1968), an associate architect of the original building, carried out the work to assure consistency with the original architectural vision.

The museum opened yet another addition, designed by Johnson and his partner John Burgee, in 1977. It expanded the museum's area by 36,600 square feet, more than doubling its original size. The three-story section included more office space, a two-story storage vault, a greatly expanded library, and a 105-seat auditorium. In 1998, the Trustees announced plans to expand the museum to provide three times the existing space for the display of art. Philip Johnson would again spearhead the design, making the building as a whole a singular example of his work, a project he called "the building of my career." While the 1961 building was retained and refurbished, the early additions (1964 and 1977) were removed, and in their place a vastly expanded structure was erected. With its overall size increased by nearly 50,000 square feet, the museum reopened to the public in 2001.

ABOUT THE CULTURAL DISTRICT, FORT WORTH, AND THE METRO REGION

The Fort Worth Cultural District grew up around the museum. Neighbor institutions include the Kimbell Art Museum with its collection of European masterworks (designed by Louis Kahn and with a new 2013 building by Renzo Piano); and the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, focusing on art since 1945 (designed by Tadao Ando). In the district are also the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History and Texas Christian University, a private, coeducational university.

Fort Worth, America’s 16th largest city, with a population of 850,000, also boasts a Zoo, Botanical Garden and Japanese Garden, 3 Aviation Museums, the Cowboy and Cowgirl Halls of Fame, the Will Rogers Memorial, Sid Richardson Museum (a collection of Western Art), Log Cabin Village, a Nature Center, and several venues for performances from concerts to rodeo, including the Bass Performance Hall .

Fort Worth has been voted one of "America’s Most Livable Communities." It has become one of the fastest growing cities in the country due to its warm climate, numerous business opportunities, low cost of living and wide array of attractions .

The Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan Area is the 4th largest n the U.S., with a rapidly growing population of over 7 million, Dallas, America’s 9th largest city, with a population of 1.3 million, is a sophisticated, cosmopolitan city only a half hour from Fort Worth. Dallas offers among its many amenities the Dallas Museum of Art, Nasher Sculpture Center, Sixth Floor Museum, Symphony Center and the International Airport. Dallas is a center for telecommunications, computer technology, banking and transportation. Dallas' prominence comes from its historical importance as a center for the oil and cotton industries, its position along numerous railroad lines, and its powerful industrial and financial leaders.

HOW TO APPLY

Nominations welcome.
Apply in confidence: Email cover letter, résumé (Word document preferred), salary requirement, and names of 3 references with contact information by September 11, 2017, to retained search firm: Marilyn Hoffman and Scott Stevens, Museum Search & Reference, SearchandRef@museum-search.com. EOE. References will not be contacted without prior permission of the applicant. The Amon Carter Museum is accepting only new applications for this reopened search.