Blogs

Frank Gohlke at Eye Level

Smithsonian American Art Museum's Eye Level blog has a substantial post covering a recent talk by photographer Frank Gohlke. The Carter organized Gohlke's exhibition Accommodating Nature, which is on view at the Smithsonian (its fourth and final venue) until March 3.

Onderdonk at the Stark

The Carter's painting, A Cloudy Day, Bluebonnets near San Antonio, Texas, by Texan impressionist Julian Onderdonk is now at the Stark Museum of Art as part of the exhibition Bluebonnets and Beyond: Julian Onderdonk, American Impressionist (previously).

Organized by the Dallas Museum of Art, the show is at its third and final venue in Orange, Texas through May 24.

Crane Is All Over the Place

Podcasts, interviews, and reviews for Barbara Crane: Challenging Vision have been popping up all weekend:

The Art of Love

Love is in the air everywhere this weekend, and so it seems like a good time to share the results of a punny game that intern Kristina Hilliard and I played last summer. The objective was to come up with lines that an art-fan could use on works in the Carter’s collection. I wish I had written our ideas down at the time, because this is all I can remember now. Feel free to share you ideas too.

They really broke the mold when they made you.

Hang around here often?

What’s your sign?

Do you believe in love at first sight or should I walk by again?

You look beautiful today, just like every other day.

You are like a dictionary, because you add meaning to my life.

Want to impress a classy lady? Take her to the gun show. Courtesy of Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy

Crane In, Lucier Out

Be sure to check out This Week in the Arts blog's new podcast, an interview with photographer Barbara Crane. Crane's first major retrospective, Barbara Crane: Challenging Vision, opens at the Carter this Saturday.

Don’t forget! The Carter's first video installation ever, Mary Lucier: The Plains of Sweet Regret closes this Sunday. Stop by this weekend and you can see the two exhibitions -- both by women photographers -- before Lucier installation is shipped back home.


Barbara Crane, Beaches and Parks, 1972–78, Courtesy of the Chicago Cultural Center, © Barbara Crane, 1972–78

Thomas Cole (and a Funky Repro)

I hadn't read the Art Blog by Bob in a while, so imagine my surprise when I saw the Carter's own Thomas Cole painting, The Garden of Eden reproduced there in a post about Cole and European influence in the Hudson River School. It's a great little article, BUT it is a pretty funky (very pink!) image of the painting. For the sake of Cole and his reputation, here is what the real thing actually looks like:

You can also see The Garden of Eden right now in the Carter's main gallery.

Rothstein in Des Moines

While we're on the subject of the midwest, you can also see one of the Carter's 34 Arthur Rothstein photographs, Vernon Evans, Migrant to Oregon from South Dakota at the Des Moines Art Center's exhibition, After Many Springs: Regionalism, Modernism & the Midwest through May. I don't have an image of this photograph handy, but you can see a different print over at the "always interesting" Shorpy photography blog. (And if you don't already know about Shorpy, definitely take a few minutes and look around).

Miller in Omaha

If you missed it in Fort Worth...

...look no further. The Carter's traveling exhibition, Sentimental Journey: The Art of Alfred Jacob Miller opens tomorrow at the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha and is up through May 10. The Joslyn is the show's final venue, and your last chance to see these works all in one place.

Doodle for a Cause

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On Wednesday, Google announced the launch of Doodle 4 Google a competition that invites U.S. school children in grades K-12 to design a Google logo inspired by the question, “What If ...?”

The winning student’s doodle will be displayed on the Google homepage on May 22, 2008; the champion “doodler” will also win a $10,000 college scholarship and a $25,000 technology grant for his/her school.

The customization of the Google logo started in 1999, and is now designed almost exclusively by Google Webmaster Dennis Hwang, whose “doodles” are seen by millions every time he exhibits on the Google homepage.

Art Show @ The Stock Show

One of the highlights of the Stock Show for me is the annual art contest for area K-12 students. Twenty-ish years after entering the annual Stock Show art contest as a kid, I had the pleasure of being one of three judges who pored over literally thousands of entries back in December. In short: it was a hoot. The awards ceremony was this past Saturday, so you can finally see the winners here, or in person over in the Justin equestrian building (near the candy! and saddles!).