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Library Items Relate to "We the People: Picturing American Identity"

We cannot always squeeze everything we want into the galleries, and some objects are not easily displayed on the walls. The research library is exhibiting several items that could not be fit into the We the People: Picturing American Identity exhibition, yet enhance the show in interesting ways.

One exhibition looks at the American ideals of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness as depicted in mass media print sources of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Another showcases the work of contemporary photographer Doug Rickard, who takes photographs of images of depressed parts of the nation from Google Street View as they appear on his computer monitor. A New American Picture comments on race and class, privacy and surveillance, and the tradition of street photography while asking the larger question of how this kind of digital image making relates to American identity.

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The Emancipation of the Negroes, January 1863, the Past and the Future
Wood engraving
In: Harper's Weekly (Jan. 24, 1863)

Barcoding!

The research library, with the help of volunteer assistance, recently finished barcoding all the books in the main part of the stacks. Close to 50,000 items had to be examined, and items without a barcode got one attached. This process not only facilitates electronic checkout to staff, but it also helped us inventory the collection. Kudos to Mary Jane Harbison, Library Technical Services Coordinator, for shepherding this monumental project.

The photo below of volunteer Phyllis Evans, chief barcoder, shows relief or perhaps shock that she has crossed the finish line!

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Library Preservation Assessment

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I have had the great pleasure of spending the past two days at the library doing a preservation assessment of the print collections. A preservation assessment is a tool for the library to use to determine what they're doing well to preserve their collections, and plan for improvements in the future. This assessment was funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

There are a few reasons that having a preservation assessment is important for libraries and archives. The first is that it serves as an internal tool for the library to determine and prioritize the next steps in their preservation program. The second, and possibly more important, is that the assessment report will make the case for the importance of preservation to stakeholders outside the library. This can be anyone from the museum's administration to users who advocate for the library, to potential funders for some of the projects I'll recommend.

I like to think that almost every facet of the library's operations has preservation implications, so this project has me looking at everything from the building's environment to the condition of the materials to disaster planning and security. Over the course of my visit, I have talked with lots of staff members about the collections and the building, and spent hours in the stacks looking at all of the library's wonderful materials. (And oh boy, do they have some wonderful materials!) Now, I'll take my research home with me and produce a written report for the library detailing all of my findings and recommendations.

I'll close by saying that the library and its staff are doing a terrific job of caring for a beautiful collection. It's a real treat for me to visit a library that obviously understands what they need to do to preserve their collections, and I'm delighted that Sam, Jon and Mary Jane have invited me here to be a part of that process.

Rebecca Elder
Adjunct Preservation Field Services Officer
Amigos Library Services

Rare Illustrated Book From Raymond Lufkin Discovered in Museum Library

Library staff recently unearthed what turns out to be an extremely rare example of an illustrated booklet from Raymond Lufkin (1899–1978). Lufkin published Drawings for Books, Magazines, and Advertisements around 1940 to promote his illustration services while living in New York's Lower East Side. Divided into two parts, "Drawings for Publishers" and "Drawings for Advertisers," the booklet showcases the range of his talent. What strikes me is how deftly he juxtaposes images, often with poetic effect. Below I show my favorite pairing: one page shows a swan gliding on a tranquil blue background, while the opposite page features an engraving showing a small boat in a turbulent storm. Not only do the images ironically relate in terms of subject, but also in terms of color: calming blue and aggressive black and white. Only two libraries, the research library at the Amon Carter, and the American Antiquarian Society, report having the title. Lufkin was an illustrator of prolific achievement active in the United States from the early to mid twentieth century, illustrating over fifty books and hundreds of advertisements. Lufkins' accomplishments also include several mural commissions for businesses in New York and work as as a camouflage artist during World War I.

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Laura McPhee's Guardians of Solitude

The museum's research library is exhibiting a copy of Laura McPhee's large photobook Guardians of Solitude, offering a chance for visitors to compare the book with a companion photograph now on display in the exhibition Big Pictures. The limited edition book marks the inaugural publication of Iris Editions in London and translates McPhee’s engagement with large-scale photographs into a book format. The images in this work document the regeneration of the landscape following a devastating fire in 2005 that ravaged an area of over 40,000 acres in the White Cloud Mountains Region in central Idaho. The sequence of photographs collectively demonstrates the interplay of destruction and creation following the fire. The special exhibition Big Pictures features McPhee’s photograph, Understory Flareups, Fourth of July Creek, Valley Road Wild Fire, Custer County, Idaho, 2005, depicting the fire as it was happening.

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Museum Acquires Kelly Fearing Papers

One of the great pleasures of being an archivist at an art museum is getting the chance to deal with manuscript materials. It is archival collections that contain the letters, diaries, scrapbooks, etc. that document an artist's life and work. It allows a researcher first-hand access to the artist. So, with great excitement, we recently had the opportunity to acquire, through the generosity of Charles Smith, the archive of Kelly Fearing.

Fearing was part of the Fort Worth Circle of Artists, primarily active in the 1940s and 1950s, who brought modernist ideas and techniques to the Fort Worth area. The Fearing archive has manuscript material spanning his Fort Worth period on into his later distinguished artistic and educational career at the University of Texas at Austin. The archive, once organized, will allow researchers to delve into Fearing's art, associations, and the milieu he worked in. It joins other private papers and records at the Amon Carter, including Fort Worth Circle artists Bror Utter, Marjorie Johnson Lee, Flora and Dickson Reeder, and Blanche McVeigh.

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Photo Above: Unprocessed Kelly Fearing Papers

Research Library Now Offering Saturday Hours

Big news! Starting this week on March 2, the research library will offer Saturday hours, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., September through May, to accommodate researchers who are not able to visit us during the work week. A reference librarian will be available in our beautiful reading room to help with your research projects. We also offer free Wi-Fi and digital scanning. Photocopy service available for a charge.

The library offers access to a collection of 140,000 items documenting the rich history of art, photography, and culture in the United States, with holdings of many rare items, including unique archival collections. We rotate a selection of some of this special material in exhibitions in the reading room. Please stop by on Saturday and let us introduce you to our fascinating collection.

Wednesday: 11 a.m.–4 p.m.
Thursday: 11 a.m.–7 p.m.
Friday: 11 a.m.–4 p.m.

Saturday: 11 a.m.–4 p.m., September through May

Other times by appointment

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The North American Sylva

Jason Dean, Cataloger & Technical Services Librarian at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art (and previously a volunteer at the research library here at the Amon Carter), recently told the fascinating story of The North American Sylva; or, a Description of the Forest Trees of the United States, Canada, and Nova Scotia . . . This signal illustrated botanical work by François André Michaux (1770–1855) and Thomas Nuttall (1786–1859) stands as the most important study of American trees before the twentieth century, offering an unparalleled record of species growing in the United States and Canada during the period. As Jason points out, this work not only combines the research of both authors but also offers the opportunity to study two different illustration techniques: early engravings (with hand-coloring) based on illustrations by the famous French flower painter Pierre-Joseph Redouté (1759–1840) and later hand-colored lithographs. Crystal Bridges has the 1841 edition (Philadelphia: J. Dobson, 1841) while the Amon Carter has the 1859 edition (Philadelphia: D. Rice & A. N. Hart, 1859). The Amon Carter's copy was acquired on the occasion of Ruth Carter Stevenson’s 80th birthday.

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Stephen Shore's "The Book of Books"

Late last year the research library acquired an intriguing photobook published by Phaidon Press, Stephen Shore's The Book of Books. Starting in the early 2000s, Shore produced a series of print-on-demand photobooks using Apple's iPhoto publishing service. Between 2003 and 2010, he produced eighty-three of these books which were made available in limited editions via various galleries. The Book of Books reproduces all these books in a two volume slipcased set, also in a limited edition (250 numbered copies), print-on-demand format. Get your mind around that! Currently, only two libraries in the country have a copy of this beautiful set of books. Please drop by the research library to take a closer look!

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Publisher's Description

How A Civil War Vet Invented The American Infographic

A recent story by Susan Schulten on Fast Company's design blog, Co.Design, highlights the work of Francis Walker, superintendent of the nation's 1870 census. Walker was a pioneering data cruncher and graphic designer, and he's credited with his work on the census, wringing intelligence out of the massive amount of data gathered about the country into a clear, graphic form. As it turns out, the museum's research library has a copy of his Statistical Atlas of the United States Based on the Results of the Ninth Census, 1870 .... This folio volume, lithographed by New York printer Julius Bien, a popular printer of government documents and map maker of the period, predates the current infographic craze by a long period and is all the more amazing given that its production was by mechanical and hand means alone. Please come by to view the volume in the research library reading room. We also have copy of Schulten's Mapping the Nation: History and Cartography in Nineteenth-century America.

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