Background: Secondary Color Eastern US
Porter occasionally made color photographs at a number of locations across the East and Midwest for reasons other than book projects. The earliest images in this category are south Florida plant studies shot in 1954, when he was there to photograph birds. He returned to shoot a swamp fire the following year and took more swamp views in early 1974. In 1968, Les Line, the long-time editor-in-chief of Audubon magazine, asked Porter to photograph Red River Gorge, Kentucky, to publicize the beauty that would be lost to a proposed dam at the site. That project led Porter to create one of his most ethereal photographs, Redbud Trees in Bottom Land, represented in this category selection by two distinctly different interpretations. Created from the same transparency, these photographs illustrate the interpretive flexibility offered by dye transfer printing.

In 1969 Porter created his first aerial photographs, views of a flooded Congaree Swamp in South Carolina. This experience facilitated his aerial work in East Africa the following year. During the middle and late 1970s, Porter intermittently traveled through Kansas, Missouri, Indiana, and Michigan collecting images for a book that he was co-authoring with Wallace and Page Stegner called American Places (1983). Closing this category are three color photographs that Porter shot on the streets of New York while there for his important 1979 exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. This category gathers together approximately 250 prints.

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