Background: Galapagos
Reading the Austrian biologist Irenaus Eibl-Ebesfeldt's book, Galįpagos: the Noah's Ark of the Pacific, in 1963 pricked Porter's interest in visiting this spot. Disturbed by Eibl-Ebesfeldt's descriptions of the reckless human abuse of the island's unusual ecology, Porter sought to create a large-format photographic book that would foster a conservationist message. The idea appealed to his friend David Brower, executive director of the Sierra Club, because this project fitted Brower's blossoming notion of an "Earth National Park" conservation campaign.

Setting off from Quito, Ecuador, Porter, his son Stephen, and a Sierra Club contingent, including Brower's son Ken, spent four months of 1966 traversing the islands, living on two sailboats chartered through a local family. Following the pattern set in Baja, Porter frequently pulled his camera up and back to create quick panoramic descriptions of the terrain. He then used his 2-¼-inch camera to document the islands' wide variety of animal life. In 1968 the Sierra Club published Galįpagos: the Flow of Wildness. Although it was by far the largest and most elaborate of Porter's books, this two-volume publication was also his last with the Sierra Club. The collection holds 327 Galįpagos prints by the artist plus six shot by his son Stephen.

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