Background: Adirondacks
In late 1963 Harold Hochschild, the founder and president of the Adirondack Museum, asked Porter to photograph the 5,700,000-acre Adirondack State Park in northeastern New York. Hochschild sought to express his love for the region and counter a lobbying campaign being run by private interests who wanted to open up the park to commercial development. The museum initially planned to assemble the work of a number of photographers. But Hochschild and his wife were so pleased with Porter's initial group of autumn transparencies that they turned the picture making over to him entirely. In 1966 Harper and Row published Forever Wild: The Adirondacks, matching Porter's photographs with passages by the nature writer William Chapman White, who had made his home in the mountains.

Following the outline that he had established in his first publication, "In Wildness Is the Preservation of the World," Porter presented a seasonal portrait of the mountains. Building on what he had learned in photographing the Glen Canyon, he created more complex compositions that often flattened spaces and, at times, presented mosaics of deep shadow and bright highlights. Although he created a few broad views at the Hochschilds' behest, much of his Adirondacks imagery presents discrete woodland details and scenery. The collection holds 171 prints. Since Porter created his Adirondack images under commission from the Adirondack Museum, that institution holds the copyright for all the images published in Forever Wild: The Adirondacks.

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